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1. Homestead and Farm Resiliency and Regeneration - Presented by Ben Falk (b021)

Homestead and Farm Resiliency and Regeneration - Presented by Ben Falk (b021)

Ben Falk discusses some of the lessons and leanings from his 10 years of living on a homestead in Vermont. He touches on topics like water management, growing trees, and growing rice. The webinar was recorded on August 10, 2013. You can watch a view of this presentation in the show notes at permaculturevoices.com/b21

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2. Permaculture Design in Temperate Zones and Cold Climate Living with Ben Falk. (PVP027)

Permaculture Design in Temperate Zones and Cold Climate Living with Ben Falk. (PVP027)

Ben Falk from Whole Systems Design, LLC joins me talk about permaculture design and what he has learned on his research site over the years. He talks about how to break into the business as a designHe touches on cold climate infrastructure and heating with wood. And he goes into his thoughts on designing a property and why it's important to understand the land's capability and how you should relate that to your goals. We also spend some time talking about the mass selection of plant genetics for a site, stressing the importance of over stacking the system in the beginning to see what works and what doesn't. Key Takeaways: Get some experience working with the land and systems before you start designing properties as "a designer." You can reduce your wood usage by 30-40% by drying wood well versus haphazardly drying it. Cold humid climates have a low tolerance for bad moisture detailing in structures. When designing a home detail carefully to keep the home dry and get water out. Grow tree multi-purpose tree species for fuel wood. Consider black locusts - fixes nitrogen, fast grower, rot resistant wood, good fuel wood, and makes great saw logs. Have goals but understand the land's capability so you can adjust those goals as needed. Don't fight against the land's tendencies and capabilities, work with it, not against it. Most people have more land than they can manage well. Moving down in acreage might be advantageous. It is better to manage 5 acres right than 100 acres wrong. Most people can have most of their needs met on 5-10 acres. Unless you have a commercial aspect or grazing component. Have a good access plan for your site. Don't box yourself out. Start and maintain a clear access pattern which is based on the water flow throughout the site. For site selection general location and access are a quick way to filter down a list of a lot of properties. Then look to the Keyline Scale of Permanance. Consider water security and controlling as much of a watershed as you can. Focus on manageability with regards to plantings. Plant based on water access with on contour swales. Not all permaculture techniques will work on all sites. So don't expect that. Practice the mass selection of genetics. Identify the best genetics from your site by growing trees from seed. Plant as many tress as you can on a site, way closer than you would ever imagine, and cut out the ones that don't do well. Use the first 3-5 years on a site to learn what does well. Years 5-10 are when you focus on plants and families that really want ot grow on your site - microclimate - aspect - soils. And there is no way to know which ones will work unless you start putting a lot of plants in the ground. Show Notes: www.permaculturevoices.com/27

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3. Good

  • Published: 2017-11-13T18:02:31Z
  • By Ben Falk
Good

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4. Designing Homestead and Farm Systems That Work f. Ben Falk & Grant Schultz (PVP040)

Designing Homestead and Farm Systems That Work f. Ben Falk & Grant Schultz (PVP040)

Ben Falk and Grant Schultz join me to talk about permaculture as a survival preparedness strategy. How can we use whole systems design to create systems that work passively to increase our resiliency. In our modern day world we are quick to throw money at technological, mechanical systems that are complicated and brittle. In an emergency situation you could have a generator, but if that breaks or you run out of fuel, you are out of luck. If you have a wood fuel based system, it is going to work no matter what, it's bulletproof. Ben and Grant are both a wealth of knowledge when it comes to homestead technology, both simple and complex. They are living the lifestyle. Using and building the systems that they talk about. They are both builders and tinkerers, therefor they understand how these systems work, and can break down. You will learn how important it is to buy high quality tool that will last a lifetime (and the tools to service the tools); often times those tools were built 80 years ago and can be bought on the cheap. They have an appreciation for good quality tools and things you can craft by hand. Simple is beautiful, simple is resilient. This isn't typical prepper talk of buying generators, storing fuel, and MREs. This is all about designing systems that will work before and after SHTF. Show Notes: www.permaculturevoices.com/40

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6. Marlo's Soft Playlist

  • Published: 2016-10-03T04:07:16Z
  • By Ben_Falk3
Marlo's Soft Playlist

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7. Kurt Rosenwinkel (guitar/comp), Mark Turner (sax), Ben Street (bass), Falk Willis (dr) Live

Kurt Rosenwinkel (guitar/comp), Mark Turner (sax), Ben Street (bass), Falk Willis (dr) Live

Kurt Rosenwinkel Quartet gig from many moons ago - 1995 in Portland, Maine. Kurt Rosenwinkel (guit/comp), Mark Turner (sax), Ben Street (bass), Falk Willis (dr) This was a live concert recorded with one microphone, so the recording quality is modest. Still, Kurt, Mark & Ben were already killing it back in the day. ;) Enjoy! Falk PS: While we're at it: check out http://JazzHeaven.com for Instructional Videos & Interviews with many of the Greatest Jazz Musicians: Lee Konitz, Kenny Werner, Eric Harland, Jerry Bergonzi, Oz Noy, Ari Hoenig, Ralph Peterson and LOTS more.

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