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21. Classical Classroom, Ep 118: Alisa Weilerstein On The Romance Of Rachmaninov

Classical Classroom, Ep 118: Alisa Weilerstein On The Romance Of Rachmaninov

Start your Valentine's Day week with cellist Alisa Weilerstein's introduction to the music of Sergey Rachmaninov. Who was this romantic man, and what makes him different from all the other guys - I mean, composers? Weilerstein walks us through Rachmaninov's Sonata in G Minor for Cello and Piano. Plus, she talks about her musical relationship with performing partner, pianist Inon Barnatan, and what it's like to be part of a long-term creative duo. Music in this episode is all from Weilerstein and Barnatan's CD, Chopin and Rachmaninov Cello Sonatas: Sonata in G Minor for Cello and Piano, Opus 19. Sergey Rachmaninov. Audio production by Todd "Toight like a toiger" Hulslander with grrrr aargh's from Dacia Clay and editing by Mark DiClaudio. Check out Alisa's other podcasts with Classical Classroom: http://bit.ly/1Rjjuvx For more about Alisa Weilerstein: www.alisaweilerstein.com For more about Inon Barnatan: www.inonbarnatan.com For more Classroom: www.houstonpublicmedia.org/classroom If you liked this episode with Alisa Weilerstein, check her out in Episode 98, too!

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22. Classical Classroom, Ep 137: Summer Music - Music Acad Of The West! The 2nd Nature of Matthew Aucoin

Classical Classroom, Ep 137: Summer Music - Music Acad Of The West! The 2nd Nature of Matthew Aucoin

In our second annual Classical Classroom Summer Music Festival Series, we hit the (sound)waves at the Music Academy of the West in sunny Santa Barbara, California! The third installment of our MAW series features composer, conductor, and pianist, Matthew Aucoin. Aucoin is a resident at that Music Academy of the West, and a sort of serial residentialist elsewhere (like the Peabody Essex Museum and soon, the Los Angeles Opera). He talks about what a “residency” is, and how it informs a composer’s creative process; plus, he gives us a sample of what he’s been busy creating while at the Music Academy. Music in this episode: - Selections from Matthew Aucoin’s Second Nature, performed at the Music Academy of the West Audio production by Todd “The Bartered Todd” Hulslander with pirouettes by Dacia Clay and assistance from Mark DiClaudio. Thanks to the Music Academy for their help with this series, and special thanks to Kate Oberjat (oh-bur-yacht) without whom this series simply would not.

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23. Classical Classroom, Episode 76: MusicWorks - How Sonya Got Her Opera On

Classical Classroom, Episode 76: MusicWorks - How Sonya Got Her Opera On

We're excited to share our new subseries, MusicWorks! It's a show where you'll learn about what classical music is doing in the world right now. You'll hear inspiring artist stories, plus we'll go into the sometimes unexpected places we've discovered classical music thriving while we've been learning about it on the Classical Classroom. We hope you dig it! In our first MusicWorks episode, soprano Sonya Yoncheva tells the story of how she happened upon her passion - singing opera - by being true to herself (and listening to her mother) and by practicing her buns off. This put her in a position to be ready when she got that call from the Met to fill in at the last moment. And the rest, as they say, is in the podcast. Audio production by Todd "Totally" Hulslander with awesomeness by Dacia Clay. Music in this episode: - Giacomo Puccini: La Boheme - Donde lieta usci - Charles Lecocq: Les Cent Vierges, Act III, No. 10 Je soupire et maudis le destin - Giuseppe Verdi: La Traviata - Sempre libera - Claudio Monteverdi: L'incoronazione di Poppea - "Pur ti Miro" (Sonya Yoncheva & Max Emanuel Cencic) - W. A. Mozart: Il Re Pastore - "L'Amero saro costante" (Sonya Yoncheva & Marc Minkowski) - Charles Gounod - Faust Final Trio - Anges Purs - Sonya Yoncheva, Joseph Calleja & Bryn Terfel For more about Sonya Yoncheva: www.sonyayoncheva.com For more Classroom: www.houstonpublicmedia.org/classroom Learn about composer George Heathco's piece, "ReGifting Lions", part of our MusicWorks intro, and oh-so-much more about him at www.georgeheathcomusic.com.

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24. Classical Classroom, Ep 131: Totally Totentanz With Tamara McCoy

Classical Classroom, Ep 131: Totally Totentanz With Tamara McCoy

The Classical Minds Festival and Competition just took place here in Houston, and though the festival is all about classical guitar, Dr. Tamara McCoy was there on piano. She stopped by the Geary Studio at Houston Public Media to record and teach about Franz Liszt’s Totentanz. As it turns out, the only thing harder than playing the piece was writing it — it took Liszt almost 20 years. Learn all about the piece, the inspiration behind it, and…Steve Holt! Download Tamara McCoy’s performance of the piece (used in this episode and produced by Todd Hulslander) on our website: www.houstonpublicmedia.org/classroom Audio production for Classical Classroom by Todd “Totentodd” Hulslander with Lisztomania by Dacia Clay. Many thanks to the awesome Valerie Hartzell for her help in making this episode happen! For more about Tamara McCoy: www.mccoypianostudio.yolasite.com

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25. Classical Classroom Episode 145 Cartoon Classical Confidential with Richard Scerbo

Classical Classroom Episode 145 Cartoon Classical Confidential with Richard Scerbo

This is serious, people. Classical music has a long and meaningful history in cartoons that is no laughing matter. Just kidding! There is a really long history, but it is hilarious, and so is this episode. Richard Scerbo, Director of the National Orchestral Institute and Festival and founder and artistic director of the DC-based and Grammy-nominated Inscape Chamber Orchestra, takes us on a tour of that history. Find out the practical, social, and financial reasons behind Looney Tunes use of classical music, and how cartoons both poked fun at the music and made it fresh for new audiences. Hear examples of the classical music the cartoons draw from and examples of how the music was rearranged to suit the needs of Porky and Bugs. And, um, that’s not all, folks. Music in this episode: - The Bartered Bride (Dance of the Comedians) by Bedrich Smetana - “Zoom and Bored” (Warner Bros. cartoon featuring Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner) - Hungarian Rhapsody No2 by Franz List - “Rhapsody in Rivets” (Warner Bros. cartoon) - “A Corny Concerto” (Warner Bros. cartoon narrated by Elmer Fudd) - The Blue Danube by Johann Strauss II - Tales from the Vienna Woods by Johann Strauss II - “Ride of the Valkeries” from Die Walküre by Richard Wagner - “Kill the Wabbit” from What’s Opera, Doc? (Warner Bros. cartoon featuring Elmer Fudd and Bugs Bunny) Audio production by Mark “The Martian” DiClaudio and Todd “Tweety” Hulslander with onomatopoeia by Dacia Clay.

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26. Classical Classroom Research Presentation: Classical Music Rivalries!

Classical Classroom Research Presentation: Classical Music Rivalries!

Are you ready to rumble?? Because these classical composers and musicians are. In this Classical Classroom short, learn all about how rivalries between musicians go back as far as music does, and how music is better for it. Audio production by Todd "Mr. T" Hulslander, with a mean left hook from Dacia Clay and jabs by MusicLab intern, Daniel Webbon. Music used in this episode includes: - "Gonna Fly Now (Theme from Rocky)" by Bill Conti from the Rocky soundtrack - "Lithium" by Nirvana from Nevermind - "Hypnotize" by the Notorious B.I.G. from Life After Death - Overture from The Barber of Seville by Giachino Rossini - Sinfonia Veneziana: Allegro assai by Antonio Salieri - Horn Call from Act 2 of Siegfried by Richard Wagner - Music of Changes, Book 1 by John Cage - Structures by Pierre Boulez - Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major, op. 15 by Ludwig van Beethoven (played by Lang Lang) - "I Knew You Were Trouble" by Taylor Swift from Red Online at www.houstonpublicmedia.org/classroom

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27. Classical Classroom Research Presentation: Why we listen to Russian music on an American holiday

Classical Classroom Research Presentation: Why we listen to Russian music on an American holiday

In this special 4th of July edition of Classical Classroom Research Presentations, Dacia ponders why Americans listen to Russian music on their Independence Day. She uncovers the [not really that] secret history of how one man and his love of pyrotechnics made Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture the theme music for America's most patriotic celebration. Written, produced, and otherwise manhandled by Dacia Clay, with thanks to Todd "Twilight's Last Gleaming" Hulslander. Music used in this episode includes: - Pyotr Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture, Boston Pops Orchestra, RCA 63516 Go to www.houstonpublicmedia.org/classroom for more information about David Mugar, Tchaikovsky, and more!

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29. Classical Classroom, Episode 79: The Women of Classical Guitar with Valerie Hartzell

Classical Classroom, Episode 79: The Women of Classical Guitar with Valerie Hartzell

It's Women's History Month, and all month, we are bringing you amazing women in classical music! In this episode, guitarist Valerie Hartzell, creator/director of the Classical Minds Festival and Competition, talks about the ladies of classical guitar. Who are they? Why did their numbers diminish over time? And what can we do about it?? Audio production by Todd "Not Tony Danza" Hulslander with editing by Mark DiClaudio and bossing by Dacia Clay. Music in this episode: - "Rosita" by Francisco Tarrega. Played live in studio (also available on Valerie's Ex Tenebris Lux CD). - Chaconne in G Major by George Frideric Handel. Played by Ida Presti and Alexandre Lagoya. For more about Valerie Hartzell: www.valeriehartzell.com For more Classroom: www.houstonpublicmedia.org/classroom

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30. Classical Classroom, Episode 49: Beethoven Gets Small With Norman Fischer

Classical Classroom, Episode 49: Beethoven Gets Small With Norman Fischer

How are the Black Keys and Beethoven alike? They both had the low-down dirty blues. JK! They both compose(d) music for two instruments! You've heard his symphonies. Now hear cellist Norman Fischer - of the Fischer Duo, the Concord String Quartet, and Rice University's Shepherd School of Music - talk about Beethoven's chamber works for cello and piano. Why did Beethoven create music for a new, tiny arrangement of instruments? Did he do it for the dolla dolla billz? Did he do it to impress a king? Find out in this episode of Classical Classroom! Audio production for this episode by Todd "Tiddlywinks" Hulslander with no production help whatsoever from that lazy nogoodnik Dacia Clay. All music in this episode performed by the Fischer Duo, and most of this comes from the Fischer Duo's new CD, "Beethoven: Cello and Piano Complete".

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31. Classical Classroom Episode 60: How Haydn's Trumpet Concerto Changed the Trumpet with Mark DiClaudio

Classical Classroom Episode 60: How Haydn's Trumpet Concerto Changed the Trumpet with Mark DiClaudio

We're back with a new episode! Whooo! How did the trumpet change from a simple horn that announced kings and queens into the sophisticated, nuanced instrument it is today? Monumental Brass Quintet trumpet player, public school music teacher, and inventor of the Buzz Clip brass player training tool, Mark DiClaudio tells how Haydn's Trumpet Concerto and a guy named Anton Weidinger literally poked holes in the instrument and changed it - forevah! Also, thoughts on music education, and SO MUCH MORE. Audio production by Todd "Tiny" Hulslander with belated but no less meaningful birthday wishes from Dacia Clay. Music in this episode: Concerto for Trumpet and Orchestra in E Flat Major, by Franz Joseph Haydn. Played by Wynton Marsalis and the National Philharmonic Orchestra. For more about Mark DiClaudio: www.diclaudiostudios.com For more Classical Classroom: www.houstonpublicmedia.org/classroom

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32. Classical Classroom, Ep 139: Summer Music – Music Academy Of The West! With Thomas Hampson

Classical Classroom, Ep 139: Summer Music – Music Academy Of The West! With Thomas Hampson

In our second annual Classical Classroom Summer Music Festival Series, we hit the (sound)waves at the Music Academy of the West in sunny Santa Barbara, California! Library of Congress “Living Legend” and Grammy Award-winning baritone Thomas Hampson has reached a point in his life and career at which one might use the term “venerable” to describe him. “Wise” is another word that music journalists probably throw down when talking about him. And they would not be wrong. But even Thomas Hampson got his start somewhere. In this interview, he talks about his classical music beginnings at the Music Academy of the West, and about conveying the grand meaning of music as a teacher to young people in master classes there now. Music in this episode (all performed by Thomas Hampson): - Three Songs Op. 10: No. 1, Rain Has Fallen by Samuel Barber - Sechs Lieder aus “Lotosblatter,” Op. 19, 6 Mein Herz ist stumm, mein Herz ist kalt by Richard Strauss - Vier Lieder, Op. 27: 3. Heimliche Aufforderung by Richard Strauss. Audio production by Todd “Toddsong” Hulslander with editing by Mark DiClaudio and lipsyncing by Dacia Clay. Thanks to the Music Academy of the West for their help with these interviews, especially to Emma Levine and Kate Oberjat, who’s quite frankly, done a lot.

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33. Classical Classroom, Episode 57: Interstellar Travel To Holst's Planets With Joshua Zinn

Classical Classroom, Episode 57: Interstellar Travel To Holst's Planets With Joshua Zinn

Climb aboard the great Classroom space coaster for a trip to Gustav Holst's "The Planets"! Composer, MusicLab intern, and self-described professional nerd Joshua Zinn is our captain on this journey through one of classical music's most influential and popular works. Who was Holst? How did he write the music for Star Wars before the movie existed!? How does one actually pronounce "Uranus"? All of these questions and more will be answered! Audio production by Todd "Titan" Hulslander with copiloting from Dacia Clay. All music in this episode is from Gustav Holst's "The Planets". For more Classroom, go to www.houstonpublicmedia.org/classroom .

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34. Classical Classroom, Episode 91: Wu Man, Pipa Ambassador

Classical Classroom, Episode 91: Wu Man, Pipa Ambassador

Wu Man, world-renowned pipa player, stopped by the Classroom while she was in Houston to teach all about the French horn. JK! She taught all about the pipa, of course! In this episode, she talks about the pipa's origins, its repertoire, about how she began playing it, and she plays some sweet tunes to illustrate the instrument's range. Music in this episode played live in the Geary Performance Studio by Wu Man. Audio production by Todd "Totaled Todd" Hulslander with bobblehead bobbling by Dacia Clay and editing by Mark DiClaudio. For more about Wu Man: www.wumanpipa.org For more Classroom: www.houstonpublicmedia.org/classroom

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35. Classical Classroom, Episode 45: Daniel Roumain’s Violin Vs. THE Violin (RR)

Classical Classroom, Episode 45: Daniel Roumain’s Violin Vs. THE Violin (RR)

That’s not a violin – it’s a woodbox! Daniel Bernard Roumain talks about creative appropriation in classical music. The Haitian-American composer’s creative world was cracked open when he realized that everything – including the definition of “violin” – was ripe for reinterpretation. As a kid in garage bands, he took the decidedly uncool violin and made it his own. As a classically trained musician, he brings classical music together with hip hop, rock, bluegrass, and other genres to create his signature sound. We talk about DBR’s creative journey and about how innovators like John Cage have changed classical music by adding an important ingredient to the genre: imagination. Music in this episode: - Lots of woodbox improvisation by Daniel Bernard Roumain - “Sonata No. 2” from Sonatas and Interludes for Prepared Piano by - John Cage, played by Boris Berman - “Sonata for Violin and Turntables, Part 1” from Woodbox Beats & Balladry by Daniel Bernard Roumain Audio production by Todd “T-Dawg” Hulslander with super disco breaking by Dacia Clay. Daniel Roumain is an artist in residence with the Cynthia Woods Mitchell Center for the Arts, which is dedicated to interdisciplinary collaboration across the performing, visual, and literary arts. Based at the University of Houston, the Mitchell Center commissions and produces new works, presents public performances and exhibitions, offers curriculum and scholarships, and hosts residencies with renowned visiting artists from throughout the world. The Center is home to the Mitchell Artist Lecture, an annual event featuring a pioneer in contemporary art-making, as well as CounterCurrent, an annual spring festival of new performance. The Mitchell Center forms an alliance among five departments at UH: the School of Art, Moores School of Music, School of Theatre & Dance, Creative Writing Program, and Blaffer Art Museum. For more information visit www.mitchellcenterforarts.org.

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36. Classical Classroom, MusicWorks, Ep 121: John From Downton Abbey

Classical Classroom, MusicWorks, Ep 121: John From Downton Abbey

Masterpiece's "Downton Abbey" came to an end last night after six seasons. In this tell-all exposé, Scottish composer John Lunn talks about his years with the Crawley family, what Lord Grantham really thought of Branson, and his thoughts on Thomas Barrow's perpetual bad attitude. Okay, okay — not exactly. But Lunn DOES talk about how he got into writing for TV, how it's different than writing operas and violin concertos, and about being part of the "Downton" team for six seasons. Past (and future!) secrets are revealed. All in a lovely Scottish accent. All music in this episode (except for the Bach) from the CD, "Downton Abbey: The Ultimate Collection": - Prelude & Fugue No. 24 in B Minor BWV 893. JS Bach. Angela Hewitt. - The Suite - Such Good Luck - Escapades - End of An Era Audio production for this episode by Todd "Lord of Toddington" Hulslander with pregnant pauses by Dacia Clay and assistance from Mark DiClaudio. For more about John Lunn: www.jlunn.com For more about Downton Abbey: www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/downtonabbey

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37. Classical Classroom, Episode 63 Preview: The Trumpet Lesson

Classical Classroom, Episode 63 Preview: The Trumpet Lesson

Not sure if you're ready to commit yet? Check out this preview of Episode 63 wherein host Dacia gets a bonafide trumpet lesson from some bonafide trumpet players, and learn all about the trumpet along the way. Oh, and don't forget to check out the video that goes along with this episode, and the short, called "A Trumpet Player's Life", too! www.houstonpublicmedia.org/classroom

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38. Classical Classroom, Ep. 152: Emerson String Quartet. 40.

Classical Classroom, Ep. 152: Emerson String Quartet. 40.

As of 2016, the Emerson String Quartet has been around for 40 years. For comparison, here is a brief list of other awesome things that have been around for 40 years: Benedict Cumberbatch, The Muppet Show, the movie Rocky, the Blues Brothers, Big Red Gum, the game Whack-a-Mole, VHS tapes, and the Ramones’ debut album. In this episode, Emerson violinist Eugene Drucker talks about what it means to play for that long with the same musicians, about what has changed over the years, and about Emerson’s new 52-CD box set. Music in this episode (all from Emerson String Quartet – Complete Recordings On Deutsche Grammophon): - String Quartet No. 14 in D Minor. Franz Schubert. - String Quartet No. 11 in F Minor. Ludwig van Beethoven. - String Quartet No. 1. Béla Bartók. - String Quartet No. 17 (“The Hunt”). Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. - Symphony No. 15. Dmitri Shostakovich. - 3 Madrigals. Bohuslav Martinů. - Lyric Suite. Alban Berg. - String Quintet for 2 violins, viola & 2 cellos in C major. Franz Schubert. Audio production by Todd “The Arthropod” Hulslander with assistance from Mark DiClaudio and blitzkrieg bopping from Dacia Clay.

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39. Classical Classroom, Episode 116: John Luther Adams Swims Through "Become Ocean"

Classical Classroom, Episode 116: John Luther Adams Swims Through

In December of last year, pop singer Taylor Swift donated $50,000 to the Seattle Symphony because she loved their recording of John Luther Adams' 42-minute work, Become Ocean. In this episode, Adams reveals his own pop culture roots, and credits Frank Zappa for getting him into classical music. He talks about his work as an environmentalist, what led him to write Ocean, and swims us through a piece so awesome that critic Alex Ross called it, "the loveliest apocalypse in musical history." Music in this episode: - Dark Waves. John Luther Adams - Ecuatorial. Edgard Varèse. - Songbirds: Woodthrush. John Luther Adams. - Become Ocean. John Luther Adams. Performed by the Seattle Symphony. Audio production by Todd "Swifty" Hulslander with "Blank Space" by Dacia Clay and editing by Mark DiClaudio. For more John Luther Adams: www.johnlutheradams.net For more Classroom: www.houstonpublicmedia.org/classroom

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40. Classical Classroom, Ep 148: The Magic Of The Sorcerer’s Apprentice, With Houston Youth Symphony

Classical Classroom, Ep 148: The Magic Of The Sorcerer’s Apprentice, With Houston Youth Symphony

Is Houston Youth Symphony the musical equivalent of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry? Classical Classroom investigates. Learn about not one, but TWO amazing things in this episode: 1. The Houston Youth Symphony, an organization that’s been making music an important part of young peoples’ lives for 70 years, and 2. “The Sorcerer’s Apprentice,” the symphonic poem written by the French composer Paul Dukas that Walt Disney brought to the masses in the movie Fantasia. Michael Webster, artistic director and conductor of the Houston Youth Symphony, and HYS bassoonist Derek Marcum play examples and take us through the entire magical piece. If you’re in Houston, you can catch Michael, Derek, and the rest of the Houston Youth Symphony playing Beethoven’s 9th to mark their 70th anniversary on November 13th. Learn more at www.houstonyouthsymphony.com. Music in this episode: - “The Sorcerer’s Apprentice,” by Paul Dukas, performed by the Houston Youth Symphony - Clarinet examples by Michael Webster - Bassoon examples by Derek Marcum Audio production for this episode by Mark “Guardian of the Mixing Board” DiClaudio and Todd “Groot” Hulslander with witty comebacks by Dacia Clay.

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