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1. What's going on (Marvin Gaye)

What's going on (Marvin Gaye)

Lucila Ogallar (voz) Luciano Corigliano (guitarra)

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2. I Heard it through the grapevine (Marvin Gaye)

I Heard it through the grapevine (Marvin Gaye)

Lucila Ogallar (voz) Luciano Corigliano (guitarra)

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3. Moves like jagger

Moves like jagger

Lucila Ogallar (voz) Luciano Corigliano (guitarra)

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4. A New Day Begins (The Detroit Mix)- FatCat Records podcast #90

A New Day Begins (The Detroit Mix)- FatCat Records podcast #90

Our latest podcast comes from Gabe Vaughn of Breakaway Records. Gabe brings us part 2 following on from last weeks podcast, 'A New Day Begins aka The Detroit Mix' "Breakaway is an ALL VINYL record store specializing in used and new sounds from the 20s up through the current, with a heavy focus on 50s, 60s and 70s music of all types. We offer thousands of LPs and 45s, spanning the genres of Soul, R&B, Rock, Garage, Psych, Punk, Jazz, Blues and more. We also sell quality vintage record playing equipment, such as turntables and receivers, as well as needles and accessories of all kinds. Breakaway just celebrated its 5 year anniversary this summer, and we look forward to many more years of digging up the best 45s, LPs, turntables & other audio gear for our customers. Breakaway was started by Austin native Gabe Vaughn (aka Secondliner), and was originally located in east Austin. Gabe hosts / DJs Austin's amazing R&B nite 'Second Sunday Sock Hop' as well as the long-running Funk & Soul party known as 'Soul Happening!' The shop has been on North Loop, in north-central Austin, for 3 years now and business has been steadily growing. Denton, Texas native, longtime DC resident, and Mice Parade alumnus Josh LaRue (aka jLa) came on board 2 1/2 years ago and he and Gabe have been slingin' records and gear, DJ'ing, putting on events, making mixes, and generally helping provide Austin with good music on vinyl ever since! Josh holds down several regular DJ gigs in Austin, including a couple at the fabulous Hotel San Jose, and runs Soul Happening! along with Gabe. When in Austin, come check us out!! Mix CDs available by mail-order." Gabe: "'A New Day Begins' is an all-Detroit mix highlighting the distinct sound of Soul music from the Motor City. Completely independant of the Motown sound, this equally as unique and noteworthy sound has been historically overshadowed by that which came from Hitsville." www.breakawayrecs.com/ www.facebook.com/BreakawayRecords TRACKLIST: 1) Parliaments - A New Day Begins (Revilot) 2) Fantastic Four - As Long As I Live (Ric Tic) 3) Precisions - You'll Soon Be Gone (Drew) 4) Aged In Soul - Not Enough Love To Satisfy (Hot Wax) 5) Holidays - All That Is Required (Revilot) 6) Brothers Of Soul - Hurry Don't Linger (Boo) 7) JJ Barnes - So Called Friends (Revilot) 8) Magictones - I'll Make It Up To You (Westbound) 9) Parliaments - All Your Goodies Are Gone (Revilot) 10) Pat Lewis - Can't Shake It Loose (Golden World) 11) Darrell Banks - Baby What'cha Got (Revilot) 12) Steve Mancha - A Love Like Yours (Groove City) 13) Superlatives - I Don't Know How (Westbound) 14) Holidays - I Keep Holding On (Revilot) 15) Steve Mancha - Don't Make Me A Story Teller (Groovesville) 16) Precisions - Why Girl (Drew) 17) Brothers Of Soul - Come On Back (Boo) 18) Parliaments - Look At What I Almost Missed (Revilot) 19) Magictones - Together, We Shall Overcome (Mah's) 20) Louis Curry - I'll Try Again Tomorrow (M-S) 21) Steve Mancha - Hate Yourself In The Morning (Groove City)

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5. Your Loves Got A Hold On Me - Sasha Rose

Your Loves Got A Hold On Me - Sasha Rose

The Hitsville Soul Sisters perform a Sasha Rose original at Neck of the Woods in SF

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6. Ex - Factor by Lauryn Hill

Ex - Factor by Lauryn Hill

The Hitsville Soul Sisters cover Ex-Factor by Lauryn Hill at Neck of the Woods in SF on 3/25/15. Visit thehitsvillesoulsisters.com for more information.

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7. Jackie Wilson - All My Love

Jackie Wilson - All My Love

From out the vault comes this historic collection of timeless classic hits by Jackie Wilson, Baby Washinton, The Flamingos and more. Each song is full of memorable melodies and sensational intrumentation that will have you tapping your toes and singing along. find us online... www.ResnikMusicGroup.com www.CountryMusicMasters.com www.DooWopMasters.com www.facebook.com/ResnikMusicGroup www.youtube.com/ResnikMusicGroup www.twitter.com/ResnikMusic ********************************** ********************************** All My Love Written by Billy Myles and Jackie Wilson Performed by Jackie Wilson ********************************** ********************************** All My Love Give me the right to give you All My Love I give you All My Love Give me the right to give you All My Love With all my might I give you All My Love If I had only half a chance Into your world O come and let me bring you All My Love No other one could give you half the love That I feel in my heart for you Come to me Come and let me share your destiny Can you see There is just you within the heart of me So wonderful I’m glad love could be so wonderful For it is written in the stars above That you were made for All My Love ********************************** ********************************** Jack Leroy "Jackie" Wilson, Jr. (June 9, 1934 – January 21, 1984) was an American singer and performer. Known as "Mr. Excitement", Wilson was important in the transition of rhythm and blues into soul. He was considered a master showman, one of the most dynamic and influential singers and performers in R&B and rock history. Gaining fame in his early years as a member of the R&B vocal group Billy Ward and His Dominoes, he went solo in 1957 and recorded over 50 hit singles that spanned R&B, pop, soul, doo-wop and easy listening. During a 1975 benefit concert, he collapsed on-stage from a heart attack and subsequently fell into a coma that persisted for nearly nine years until his death in 1984, aged 49. By this time, he had become one of the most influential artists of his generation. A two-time Grammy Hall of Fame Inductee, Jackie Wilson was inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987. In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine ranked Jackie Wilson #69 on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time. Jack Leroy Wilson, Jr. was born on June 9, 1934 in Detroit, Michigan, the only son of Jack Sr. and Eliza Mae Wilson, as she lost 2 previous children. Eliza Mae was born on The Billups-Whitfield Place in Columbus, Mississippi. Her parents were Tom and Virginia Ransom. Jackie often visited his family in Columbus and was greatly influenced by the choir at Billups Chapel. Growing up in the rough Detroit area of Highland Park, Wilson joined a gang called the Shakers (the name taken from the Shaker Heights section of Detroit) and often found himself in trouble. Wilson's father was frequently absent, as he was alcoholic and usually out of work. Wilson began singing at an early age, accompanying his mother, once a choir singer, to church. In his early teens Jackie joined a quartet, the Ever Ready Gospel Singers, which became a popular feature of churches in the area. Jackie wasn't very religious, he just loved to sing and the cash he and his group earned came in handy for the cheap wine which he drank since the age of nine. Jack Sr. and Eliza separated shortly after Jackie turned nine. Wilson dropped out of high school at age 15, having already been sentenced to detention in the Lansing Corrections system for juveniles twice. During his second stint in detention, he learned boxing and started performing in the amateur circuit in the Detroit area at the age of 16. His record in the Golden Gloves was 2 and 8. After his mother pleaded with him to quit, Wilson got married to Freda Hood and became a father at 17. It is rumored that he fathered at least 10 other children and was forced to marry Hood by her father. He gave up boxing for music, first working at Lee's Sensation club as a solo singer, then forming a group called the Falcons (not to be confused with The Falcons Wilson Pickett was part of), that included cousin Levi Stubbs, who later went on to lead the Four Tops (two more of Wilson's cousins, Hubert Johnson and Levi's brother Joe, later became members of The Contours). The other members joined Hank Ballard as part of The Midnighters. Jackie Wilson was soon discovered by talent agent Johnny Otis, who assigned him to join a group called the Thrillers. That group would later be known as The Royals (who would later evolve into R&B group, The Midnighters, but Wilson wasn't part of the group when they changed their name and signed with King Records). LaVern Baker, Little Willie John, Johnnie Ray and Della Reese were acts managed by Al Green, owner of two music publishing companies, Pearl Music and Merrimac Music, and Detroit's Flame Show Bar where Wilson met Baker (not to be confused with R&B singer Al Green, nor Al Green of the now defunct National Records). After recording his first version of "Danny Boy" and a few other tracks on Dizzy Gillespie's record label Dee Gee Records under the name Sonny Wilson (his nickname), Wilson was eventually hired by Billy Ward in 1953 to join a group Ward formed in 1950 called The Dominoes, after a successful audition to replace the immensely popular Clyde McPhatter, who had left and formed his own group, The Drifters. Wilson almost blew his chance that day, showing up calling himself "Shit" Wilson and bragging about being a better singer than McPhatter. Ward felt a stage name would fit The Dominoes' image, hence Jackie Wilson. Prior to leaving The Dominoes, McPhatter coached Wilson on the sound Billy Ward wanted for his group, influencing Wilson's singing style and stage presence. "I learned a lot from Clyde, that high-pitched choke he used and other things...Clyde McPhatter was my man. Clyde and Billy Ward." Forties blues singer Roy Brown was also an influence on him, and Wilson grew up listening to The Mills Brothers, The Ink Spots, Louis Jordan and Al Jolson. Wilson was the group's lead singer for three years, but the Dominoes lost some of their stride with the departure of McPhatter. They were able to make appearances riding on the strength of the group's earlier hits, until 1956 when the Dominoes recorded Wilson with an unlikely interpretation of the pop hit, "St. Therese of the Roses", giving The Dominoes another brief moment in the spotlight again. (Their only other post-McPhatter/Wilson successes were "Stardust", released July 15, 1957, and "Deep Purple", released Oct. 7, 1957). In 1957 Wilson set out to begin a solo career, leaving the Dominoes and collaborating with cousin Levi and got work at Detroit's Flame Show Bar owned by Al Green. Green worked out a deal with Decca Records, and Wilson was signed to their subsidiary label, Brunswick. Shortly before Wilson signed a solo contract with Brunswick, Al Green suddenly died. Green's business partner, Nat Tarnopol, took over as Wilson's manager (and later rose to president of Brunswick). Wilson's first single was released, "Reet Petite" from the album He's So Fine, which became a modest R&B success (and many years later, a huge international smash). The song was written by another former boxer, Berry Gordy, Jr., who co-wrote it with partner Roquel "Billy" Davis (who also went by the pseudonym Tyran Carlo) and Gordy's sister Gwendolyn. The trio composed and produced six further singles for Wilson, which included "To Be Loved", "I'm Wanderin'", "We Have Love", "That's Why (I Love You So)", "I'll Be Satisfied" and his late-1958 signature song, "Lonely Teardrops", which peaked at No. 7 on the pop charts, No. 1 on the R&B charts, and established him as an R&B superstar known for his extraordinary, operatic multi-octave vocal range. Due to his fervor when performing, with his dynamic dance moves, singing and impeccable dress, he was soon christened "Mr. Excitement", a title he would keep for the remainder of his career. His stagecraft in his live shows inspired James Brown, Michael Jackson[11] and Elvis Presley, among a host of other artists. Presley was so impressed by Wilson that he made it a point to meet him, and the two instantly became good friends. Presley once dubbed Jackie "The Black Elvis". Wilson's powerful, electrifying live performances rarely failed to bring audiences to a state of frenzy. His live performances consisted of knee-drops, splits, spins,back-flips, one-footed across-the-floor slides, a lot of basic boxing steps (advance and retreat shuffling) and one of his favorite routines, getting some of the less attractive girls in the audience to come up and kiss him. "If I kiss the ugliest girl in the audience, they'll all think they can have me and keep coming back and buying my records." Having women come up to kiss is one reason Wilson kept bottles of mouthwash in his dressing room. Another reason was probably his attempt to hide the alcohol on his breath. Wilson also said he was influenced by Presley too, saying "A lot of people have accused Elvis of stealing the black man’s music, when in fact, almost every black solo entertainer copied his stage mannerisms from Elvis." In 1958, Davis and Gordy left Wilson and Brunswick after royalty disputes escalated between them and Nat Tarnopol. Davis soon became a successful staff songwriter and producer for Chess Records, while Gordy borrowed $800 from his family and used money he earned from royalties writing for Wilson to start his own recording studio, Hitsville USA, the foundation of Motown Records in his native Detroit. Meanwhile, convinced that Wilson could venture out of R&B and rock and roll, Tarnopol had the singer record operatic ballads and easy listening material, pairing him with Decca Records' veteran arranger Dick Jacobs. Wilson scored hits as he entered the 1960s with the No. 15 "Doggin' Around", the No. 1 pop ballad "Night", and "Baby Workout", another Top 10 hit (No. 5), which he composed with Midnighters member Alonzo Tucker. His songwriting alliance with Tucker also turned out other songs, including "No Pity (In The Naked City)" and "I'm So Lonely." Top 10 hits continued with "Alone At Last" (No. 8 in 1960) and "My Empty Arms" (No. 9 in 1961). Also in 1961, Wilson recorded a tribute album to Al Jolson, Nowstalgia...You Ain't Heard Nothin' Yet, which included the only album liner notes he ever wrote: "...to the greatest entertainer of this or any other era...I guess I have just about every recording he's ever made, and I rarely missed listening to him on the radio...During the three years I've been making records, I've had the ambition to do an album of songs, which, to me, represent the great Jolson heritage...This is simply my humble tribute to the one man I admire most in this business...to keep the heritage of Jolson alive." The album was a commercial failure. Following the success of "Baby Workout", Wilson experienced a lull in his career between 1964 and 1966 as Tarnopol and Brunswick Records released a succession of unsuccessful albums and singles. Despite the lack of sales success, he still made artistic gains as he recorded an album with Count Basie, as well as a series of duets with rhythm and blues legend Lavern Baker and gospel singer Linda Hopkins. In 1966, he scored the first of two big comeback singles with established Chicago soul producer Carl Davis with "Whispers (Gettin' Louder)" and "(Your Love Keeps Lifting Me) Higher and Higher", a No. 6 Pop smash in 1967, which became one of his final pop hits. This was followed by "I Get the Sweetest Feeling", which, despite its modest initial chart success in the US (Billboard Pop #34), has since become one of his biggest international chart successes, becoming a Top 10 hit in the UK twice, in 1972 and in 1987, and a Top 20 hit in the Dutch Top 40, and has spawned numerous cover versions by other artists such as Edwin Starr, Will Young, Erma Franklin (Aretha's sister) and Liz McClarnon. A key to his musical rebirth was that Davis insisted that Wilson no longer record with Brunswick's musicians in New York; instead, he would record with legendary Detroit musicians normally employed by Motown Records and also Davis' own Chicago-based session players. The Detroit musicians, known as The Funk Brothers, participated on Wilson's recordings due to their respect for Davis and Wilson. By 1975, Wilson and The Chi-Lites were Brunswick's only significant artists left on the aging label's roster. Until then, Wilson continued to record singles that found success on the R&B chart, but found no significant pop chart success. His final hit, "You Got Me Walkin' ", written by Eugene Record of the Chi-Lites, was released in 1972 with the Chi-Lites backing him on vocals and instruments. Wilson's personal life was full of tragedy. In 1960 in New Orleans, Wilson was arrested and charged with assaulting a police officer when fans tried to climb onstage with Wilson. He shoved a policeman who had shoved one of the fans. Wilson had a reputation of being rather quick-tempered. On February 15, 1961 in Manhattan, Wilson was injured in a shooting. It is said the real story behind this incident is that one of his girlfriends, Juanita Jones, shot and wounded him in a jealous rage when he returned to his Manhattan apartment with another woman, fashion model Harlean Harris, an ex-girlfriend of Sam Cooke's. Supposedly, his management concocted a story to protect Wilson's reputation; that Jones was an obsessed fan who had threatened to shoot herself, and that Wilson's intervention resulted in him being shot. Wilson was shot twice in the back: One bullet would result in the loss of a kidney, the other lodged too close to his spine to be operated on. However, in early 1975, in an interview conducted by author Arnold Shaw, Wilson maintained it actually was an zealous fan whom he didn't know that shot him. "We also had some trouble in 1961. That was when some crazy chick took a shot at me and nearly put me away for good..." Nonetheless, the story of the zealous fan was accepted, and no charges were brought against Jones. A month and a half later after the shooting incident, Jackie was discharged from the hospital and apart from a limp and discomfort for a while, he was quickly on the mend. At the time Jackie had declared annual earnings of $263,000, while the average salary a man earned then was just $5,000 a year, but he discovered that, despite being at the peak of success, he was broke. Around this time the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) seized Jackie's Detroit family home. Tarnopol and his accountant were supposed to take care of such matters. Fortunately, Jackie made arrangements with the IRS to make restitution on the unpaid taxes and to re-purchase the family home at auction. In March 1967, Wilson and friend/drummer Jimmy Smith were arrested in South Carolina on "morals charges"; the two were entertaining two 24-year old white women in their motel room. Freda Hood, Wilson's first wife, with whom he had four children, divorced him in 1965 after 14 years of marriage, frustrated with his notorious womanizing. Although the divorce was amicable, Freda would regret her decision. Freda never stopped loving him, and Jackie treated her as though she were still his wife. His 16-year-old son, Jackie Jr. was shot and killed on a neighbor's porch in 1970 and two of Wilson's daughters also died at a young age. His daughter Sandra died in 1977 at the age of 24 of an apparent heart attack. Jacqueline Wilson was killed in 1988 in a drug related incident in Highland Park, Michigan. The death of Jackie Jr. devastated Wilson. He sank into a period of depression, and for the next couple of years he remained mostly a recluse, drinking and using marijuana and cocaine. Wilson's second marriage was to model Harlean Harris in 1967 with whom he had three children, but they separated soon after. Wilson later met and lived with Lynn Crochet. He was with Crochet until his heart attack in 1975. However, as he and Harris never officially divorced, Harris took the role of Wilson's caregiver for the singer's remaining nine years. Wilson converted to Judaism as an adult. Patti LaBelle wrote in her biography that Wilson once tried to force himself on her in her teenage years, as she waited backstage to meet him after one of his performances. On September 29, 1975, Wilson was one of the featured acts in Dick Clark's Good Ol' Rock and Roll Revue, hosted by the Latin Casino near Cherry Hill, New Jersey. He was in the middle of singing "Lonely Teardrops" when he suffered a heart attack, during the middle of the line: "My heart is crying." When he collapsed on stage, audience members initially thought it was part of the act. Dick Clark, when he saw it, ordered the musicians to stop the music. Cornell Gunter of The Coasters, who was backstage, noticed Wilson was not breathing. Gunter was able to resuscitate him and Wilson was then rushed to a nearby hospital. Medical personnel worked nearly 30 minutes to stabilize his vitals, but the lack of oxygen to his brain caused him to slip into a coma. He briefly emerged in early 1976, and was even able to take a few wobbly steps but slipped back into a semi-comatose state. He was a resident of the Medford Leas Retirement Center in Mount Holly, NJ when he was admitted into Memorial Hospital of Burlington County, NJ due to having trouble taking nourishment, according to Wilson's attorney John Mulkerin. Jackie Wilson died on January 21, 1984, at the age of 49 from complications of pneumonia. Initially, he was buried in an unmarked grave at Westlawn Cemetery near Detroit. In 1987, a fundraiser collected enough money to purchase a headstone.

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8. 07 Soul Shifter

07 Soul Shifter

Singer/violinist Lorenza Ponce has crafted a sultry rock/Americana collection on her new CD, ‘Soul Shifter.’ Featuring her ethereal vocals and blues violin, Ponce’s album charts a path out of the shadows and into the spotlight for a talented artist who has spent years as a self professed ‘rock-girl side person’ for such superstars as Sheryl Crow and as violinist for Bon Jovi and others. On ‘Soul Shifter,’ Ponce eschews the new-age instrumentals of her previous solo efforts and instead has embraced vocals and the roots rock grooves she had always hoped to create. ‘Soul Shifter’ was produced, recorded and mixed by Matt Wells in New York City, using instruments from his collection of vintage items, including an equalizer from Hitsville USA (the original Motown studio); the Fender Rhodes Mick Jones used on Foreigner’s hits, and even a cowbell Matt’s brother “borrowed” from Foghat in the 70’s…The result, Ponce explains, represents “a style change from the classical training and new age music of my past, while incorporating the ‘graduate degree’ I have earned at the school of rock star employers and mentors."

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9. Soul Shifter

Soul Shifter

Singer/violinist Lorenza Ponce has crafted a sultry rock/Americana collection on her new CD, ‘Soul Shifter.’ Featuring her ethereal vocals and blues violin, Ponce’s album charts a path out of the shadows and into the spotlight for a talented artist who has spent years as a self professed ‘rock-girl side person’ for such superstars as Sheryl Crow and as violinist for Bon Jovi and others. On ‘Soul Shifter,’ Ponce eschews the new-age instrumentals of her previous solo efforts and instead has embraced vocals and the roots rock grooves she had always hoped to create. ‘Soul Shifter’ was produced, recorded and mixed by Matt Wells in New York City, using instruments from his collection of vintage items, including an equalizer from Hitsville USA (the original Motown studio); the Fender Rhodes Mick Jones used on Foreigner’s hits, and even a cowbell Matt’s brother “borrowed” from Foghat in the 70’s…The result, Ponce explains, represents “a style change from the classical training and new age music of my past, while incorporating the ‘graduate degree’ I have earned at the school of rock star employers and mentors."

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10. Really Got a Hold on Me: 'Motown The Musical' with Smokey Performer Nicholas Christopher

  • Published: 2014-11-05T20:56:46Z
  • By WDET
Really Got a Hold on Me: 'Motown The Musical' with Smokey Performer Nicholas Christopher

After premiering in New York two years ago last, 'Motown The Musical' is finally home in Detroit, just blocks away from Hitsville U.S.A. to tell the dramatic, decades-long, internationally fabled story of the famed Motown Records label. With a ceaseless string of hits, performed with style and soul on sets that due the songs justice, the tale is told from the view-point of founder (and the stage production's producer) Berry Gordy and star Diana Ross. Nicholas Christopher portrays Gordy's confidant and early star Smokey Robinson and has been with the company since its opening on Broadway. Christopher spoke with Culture City host Travis Wright.

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11. Episode 6: Soul Sisters

Episode 6: Soul Sisters

Welcome back Diggers! It’s been too long, we know, but please be assured we are working on ways to get you more content and get it to you faster. We thank you for your patience. In this episode we — finally !— get to meet some powerful and successful Rock n Roll women. It’s a great storyline we will grow and develop as we move through the years. To the best of our ability, we employ a feminist perspective for much of today’s discussion; we think that’s what serves the story best, and it just feels like the right thing to do.  We open in Manhattan, in the main room, the big studio at Columbia Records. It’s Fall of 1963. A big-time, high-stakes recording session for Aretha Franklin is about to get underway. Aretha is an astonishing, one-in-a-billion talent, but it’s just not clicking for her at Columbia. We spend a little time exploring why it isn’t clicking, and then we talk a little about the feminist perspective, and why we think it is called for. And we move on from Manhattan, to South Grand Avenue in Detroit; to Hitsville, USA—Motown Records. Early summer, 1964, and Berry Gordy and Smokey Robinson are worried. Motown has taken a tough hit, losing their top-selling artist, Mary Wells. These guys have no way of knowing it, but not to worry: Motown is just about to BLOW UP. And it’s the first female pop superstar, Diana Ross, who will touch off that explosion. We talk a bit about Berry, about the Motown Fun Factory, and about Diana. And we have to stop and wonder: why does a driven, ambitious man like Berry Gordy get called a visionary and a leader, but a driven and ambitious woman like Diana…well she gets called something else entirely. What’s the deal there? Then we head south, Deep South, to Muscle Shoals, Alabama, and meet the Swampers. We hear from the effusive, fast-talking Atlantic Records Exec, Jerry Wexler. When Aretha comes over to Atlantic, it’s Wex who puts her together with the Swampers. It’s a magical moment, but it does not last. While there may have been cooperation and racial harmony in the studio, outside it’s still Alabama. That state is convulsed by the civil rights movement and the angry, hateful backlash it inspires. And it’s not just the state of Alabama; it is a tense and angry nation that awaits The Fire Next Time. We close out the show with a detailed look at the anguish and the glory of Aretha Franklin and her music. A holy blend; a terrible beauty: captured and preserved forever. Give us your feedback & unhinged rants at: www.rocknrollarchaeology.com/ email: [email protected] facebook.com/TheRNRAP    Twitter & Instagram: @rnrarchaeology EPISODE 6 PLAYLISTS Follow rnrarchaeology on Spotify https://open.spotify.com/user/rocknrollarchaeology/playlist/7HOMJE0gdg6dwSpLysVQ87 YouTube https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4ib4HPJOmb13HKH8MFlqgWQld8dgmTnG SHOW NOTES & CREDITS Songs from Episode 6 Arthur Conley: “Sweet Soul Music,” (Written by Arthur Conley, Sam Cooke, and Otis Redding), single released 1967, Atco Records The Drifters: “On Broadway,” (Written by Barry Mann, Cynthia Weil, Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller), single released 1963, Atlantic Records Aretha Franklin: “Soulville,” (Written by Titus Turner, Morris Levy, Henry Glover, and Dinah Washington), from Unforgettable: a Tribute to Dinah Washington, 1964 Columbia Records Aretha Franklin: “Over the Rainbow,” (Written by Harold Arlen and E.Y. Harburg) from Aretha: With The Ray Bryant Combo, 1961 Columbia Records James Brown: “It’s a Man’s, Man’s, Man’s World,” (Written by James Brown and Betty Newsome), single released 1966, King Records Mary Wells: “My Guy,” (Written by Smokey Robinson), single released 1964, Motown Records Martha and The Vandellas:...

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12. 2017 INTERVIEW with LOUVAIN DEMPS of Motown's Andantes (LIVE on "The Sound of Soul with D'Nicole")

2017 INTERVIEW with LOUVAIN DEMPS of Motown's Andantes (LIVE on

20,000 - that's one estimate of how many songs The Andantes sang on. Who are they, you ask? They were Jackie Hicks, Marlene Barrow and Louvain Demps - Motown's female trio whose background vocals can be heard on just about every hit out of Hitsville, U.S.A from The Marvelettes to Marvin Gaye to the Four Tops. I had the pleasure of interviewing Ms. Demps live on my show, "The Sound of Soul with D'Nicole," on WOWD-LP 94.3 FM in Takoma Park, MD on Sunday, April 9th. In our conversation, she discussed her transition from opera to R&B, one of her favorite recording sessions at Motown, the secret to the Andantes' stellar harmonies, and much more! Check it out! And you can find Ms Demps on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/louvain.demps

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13. Natural Woman

Natural Woman

The Intentions were built to perform with the same energy, urgency, and passion as their icons: Aretha Franklin, Sam & Dave, The Supremes, Stevie Wonder, Otis Redding, Marvin Gaye, The Jackson 5, and so many more. Their 11-piece band was assembled to achieve the driving sound that characterized Hitsville USA and Stax nearly fifty years ago. And they were formed with sincerity and dedication to create memories and melodies that would last a lifetime. Today, The Intentions have become a true double threat. Not only are they continuing to wow audiences with their dynamic and inspired private performances, they have now also set out with their own original music. Inspired by the soul revival championed by Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings, The Quantic Soul Orchestra, and Amy Winehouse, The Intentions have utilized the vintage analog recording techniques of the 60’s to record their debut album, scheduled for release this summer.

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14. Aint Nothing Like The Real Thing

Aint Nothing Like The Real Thing

The Intentions were built to perform with the same energy, urgency, and passion as their icons: Aretha Franklin, Sam & Dave, The Supremes, Stevie Wonder, Otis Redding, Marvin Gaye, The Jackson 5, and so many more. Their 11-piece band was assembled to achieve the driving sound that characterized Hitsville USA and Stax nearly fifty years ago. And they were formed with sincerity and dedication to create memories and melodies that would last a lifetime. Today, The Intentions have become a true double threat. Not only are they continuing to wow audiences with their dynamic and inspired private performances, they have now also set out with their own original music. Inspired by the soul revival championed by Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings, The Quantic Soul Orchestra, and Amy Winehouse, The Intentions have utilized the vintage analog recording techniques of the 60’s to record their debut album, scheduled for release this summer.

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15. 02 Remedy

02 Remedy

Singer/violinist Lorenza Ponce has crafted a sultry rock/Americana collection on her new CD, ‘Soul Shifter.’ Featuring her ethereal vocals and blues violin, Ponce’s album charts a path out of the shadows and into the spotlight for a talented artist who has spent years as a self professed ‘rock-girl side person’ for such superstars as Sheryl Crow and as violinist for Bon Jovi and others. On ‘Soul Shifter,’ Ponce eschews the new-age instrumentals of her previous solo efforts and instead has embraced vocals and the roots rock grooves she had always hoped to create. ‘Soul Shifter’ was produced, recorded and mixed by Matt Wells in New York City, using instruments from his collection of vintage items, including an equalizer from Hitsville USA (the original Motown studio); the Fender Rhodes Mick Jones used on Foreigner’s hits, and even a cowbell Matt’s brother “borrowed” from Foghat in the 70’s…The result, Ponce explains, represents “a style change from the classical training and new age music of my past, while incorporating the ‘graduate degree’ I have earned at the school of rock star employers and mentors."

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16. The Dance SF 2014

The Dance SF 2014

Project AMPLIFI and MoreSF present The Dance SF, a dance marathon to support the homeless youth services of At The Crossroads. Headlined by legendary DJ Grandmaster Flash and featuring a lineup of the best Bay Area DJ’s, dancers will enjoy an outdoor food-truck garden, yoga, massage, dance lessons, contests, and more. Register and join a team at www.thedancesf.org On Saturday, October 11, individual and organized teams of dancers from every skill level danced for eight hours, from 9am to 5pm. Entertainment provided by: GRANDMASTER FLASH J BOOGIE MOTOWN on MONDAYS DJ's featuring the Hitsville Soul Sisters (Live Motown Revue) AFROLICIOUS DJ SET by DJ PLEASUREMAKER plus live percussion NON STOP BHANGRA with Dholrhythms Dance Troupe (also doing a dance lesson) DJ MATT HAZE featuring DYLAN GERMICK (of PLANET BOOTY) DJ ALARM SILENT FRISCO outside in the Food Truck Garden

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