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1. Stock Market: What Makes Us Tick 1952 New York Stock Exchange 12min

  • Duration: 695
  • Channel: tv
Stock Market: What Makes Us Tick 1952 New York Stock Exchange 12min

more at \r\rCartoon promoting the stock market as the engine of Americas prosperity.\r\rNEW VERSION with improved video & sound: \r\rPublic domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archive, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied.\rThe soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and equalization.\r\r\r\r.The purpose of a stock exchange is to facilitate the exchange of securities between buyers and sellers, thus providing a marketplace (virtual or real). The exchanges provide real-time trading information on the listed securities, facilitating price discovery.\r\rThe New York Stock Exchange is a physical exchange, also referred to as a listed exchange -- only stocks listed with the exchange may be traded. Orders enter by way of exchange members and flow down to a floor broker, who goes to the floor trading post specialist for that stock to trade the order. The specialists job is to match buy and sell orders using open outcry. If a spread exists, no trade immediately takes place—in this case the specialist should use his/her own resources (money or stock) to close the difference after his/her judged time. Once a trade has been made the details are reported on the tape and sent back to the brokerage firm, which then notifies the investor who placed the order. Although there is a significant amount of human contact in this process, computers play an important role, especially for so-called program trading.\r\rThe NASDAQ is a virtual listed exchange, where all of the trading is done over a computer network. The process is similar to the New York Stock Exchange. However, buyers and sellers are electronically matched. One or more NASDAQ market makers will always provide a bid and ask price at which they will always purchase or sell their stock.\r\rThe Paris Bourse, now part of Euronext, is an order-driven, electronic stock exchange. It was automated in the late 1980s. Prior to the 1980s, it consisted of an open outcry exchange. Stockbrokers met on the trading floor or the Palais Brongniart. In 1986, the CATS trading system was introduced, and the order matching process was fully automated.\r\rFrom time to time, active trading (especially in large blocks of securities) have moved away from the active exchanges. Securities firms, led by UBS AG, Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and Credit Suisse Group, already steer 12 percent of U.S. security trades away from the exchanges to their internal systems. That share probably will increase to 18 percent by 2010 as more investment banks bypass the NYSE and NASDAQ and pair buyers and sellers of securities themselves, according to data compiled by Boston-based Aite Group LLC, a brokerage-industry consultant.\r\rNow that computers have eliminated the need for trading floors like the Big Boards, the balance of power in equity markets is shifting. By bringing more orders in-house, where clients can move big blocks of stock anonymously, brokers pay the exchanges less in fees and capture a bigger share of the $11 billion a year that institutional investors pay in trading commissions.\r\rIn 12th century France the courratiers de change were concerned with managing and regulating the debts of agricultural communities on behalf of the banks. Because these men also traded with debts, they could be called the first brokers. A common misbelief is that in late 13th century Bruges commodity traders gathered inside the house of a man called Van der Beurze, and in 1309 they became the Brugse Beurse, institutionalizing what had been, until then, an informal meeting, but actually, the family Van der Beurze had a building in Antwerp where those gatherings occurred; the Van der Beurze had Antwerp, as most of the merchants of that period, as their primary place for trading. The idea quickly spread.\r\rIn the middle of the 13th century, Venetian bankers began to trade in government securities. In 1351 the Venetian government outlawed spreading rumors intended to lower the price of government funds. Bankers in Pisa, Verona, Genoa and Florence also began trading in government securities during the 14th century. This was only possible because these were independent city states not ruled by a duke but a council of influential citizens. Italian companies were also the first to issue shares. Companies in England and the Low Countries followed in the 16th century. The Dutch East India Company (founded in 1602) was the first joint-stock company to get a fixed capital stock and as a result, continuous trade in company stock emerged on the Amsterdam Exchange. Soon thereafter, a lively trade in various derivatives, among which options and repos, emerged on the Amsterdam m


2. What Makes us Tick 1952 ~ New York Stock Exchange Cartoon

  • Duration: 695
  • Channel: webcam
What Makes us Tick 1952 ~ New York Stock Exchange Cartoon

What Makes us Tick 1952 ~ New York Stock Exchange Cartoonhttp://thesunfrog.com Visit and get free shirts. Choose from thousands of tees and hoodies with cheapest price here. Sunfrog has a large selection of shirt styles. Satisfaction guaranteed.http://thesunfrog.com Visit and get free shirts. Choose from thousands of tees and hoodies with cheapest price here. Sunfrog has a large selection of shirt styles. Satisfaction guaranteed.http://thesunfrog.com Visit and get free shirts. Choose from thousands of tees and hoodies with cheapest price here. Sunfrog has a large selection of shirt styles. Satisfaction guaranteed.http://thesunfrog.com Visit and get free shirts. Choose from thousands of tees and hoodies with cheapest price here. Sunfrog has a large selection of shirt styles. Satisfaction guaranteed.http://thesunfrog.com Visit and get free shirts. Choose from thousands of tees and hoodies with cheapest price here. Sunfrog has a large selection of shirt styles. Satisfaction guaranteed.


3. NYSE: What Makes Us Tick - 1952

  • Duration: 700
  • Channel: news
NYSE: What Makes Us Tick - 1952

NYSE: What Makes Us Tick - 1952


4. Spotify Makes Stellar Debut On New York Stock Exchange

  • Duration: 50
  • Channel: news
Spotify Makes Stellar Debut On New York Stock Exchange

Shares of Spotify Technology SA ended up 12.9 percent on their first day of trade on the New York Stock Exchange, a smooth debut that could pave the way for other companies looking to go public without the aid of Wall Street underwriters. Spotify shares opened at $165.90, up nearly 26 percent from a reference price of $132 set by the NYSE late on Monday. The stock ended the session at $149.01, valuing the world’s largest streaming music service at $26.5 billion.


5. Spotify Makes Stellar Debut On New York Stock Exchange

  • Duration: 50
  • Channel: news
Spotify Makes Stellar Debut On New York Stock Exchange

Shares of Spotify Technology SA ended up 12.9 percent on their first day of trade on the New York Stock Exchange, a smooth debut that could pave the way for other companies looking to go public without the aid of Wall Street underwriters. Spotify shares opened at $165.90, up nearly 26 percent from a reference price of $132 set by the NYSE late on Monday. The stock ended the session at $149.01, valuing the world’s largest streaming music service at $26.5 billion.


6. Snapchat makes its debut on the Stock Exchange

  • Duration: 214
  • Channel: news
Snapchat makes its debut on the Stock Exchange

This piece first broadcast on 2 Mar 2017. Televised on UK's national television Sky News.


7. Pakistan stock exchange makes a new record

  • Duration: 76
  • Channel: news
Pakistan stock exchange makes a new record

Pakistan stock exchange makes a new record


8. Tel-Aviv Stock Exchange CEO makes the case for dual listing

  • Duration: 171
  • Channel: news
Tel-Aviv Stock Exchange CEO makes the case for dual listing

'The luxury of being traded in another time zone' is one of the reasons why Ester Levanon, CEO of the Tel-Aviv Stock Exchange, suggests that American companies dual list on a U.S. exchange and in Tel Aviv.



10. Tel-Aviv Stock Exchange CEO makes the case for dual listing

  • Duration: 171
  • Channel: fun
Tel-Aviv Stock Exchange CEO makes the case for dual listing

"The luxury of being traded in another time zone" is one of the reasons why Ester Levanon, CEO of the Tel-Aviv Stock Exchange, suggests that American companies dual list on a U.S. exchange and in Tel Aviv. "They gain a new kind of investor in Israel, or for Europe, or even for the Far East." When it comes to the Deutsche Borse AG and NYSE Euronext merger, Levanon says, "They are too big to be affecting us," but "it might affect very heavily, bigger exchanges than Israel." -Katie Roof


11. NBC Universal Makes Large Investment Into Snap

  • Duration: 39
  • Channel: news
NBC Universal Makes Large Investment Into Snap

According to a report, NBC Universal invested over $500 million in Snapchat's parent company Snap during its Initial Public Offering this week. According to CNBC, NBCU is currently the only media company in the U.S. to invest in Snap at the IPO stage. Stock for the company opened on Thursday trading on the New York Stock Exchange at $24 per share. In addition to Snap, NBCU has made several million dollar investments in digital media, including Buzzfeed and Vox. It also owns the tech site Recode.


12. NBC Universal Makes Large Investment Into Snap

  • Duration: 39
  • Channel: news
NBC Universal Makes Large Investment Into Snap

According to a report, NBC Universal invested over $500 million in Snapchat's parent company Snap during its Initial Public Offering this week. According to CNBC, NBCU is currently the only media company in the U.S. to invest in Snap at the IPO stage. Stock for the company opened on Thursday trading on the New York Stock Exchange at $24 per share. In addition to Snap, NBCU has made several million dollar investments in digital media, including Buzzfeed and Vox. It also owns the tech site Recode.


13. Wall Street gets ready for business

  • Duration: 143
  • Channel: news
Wall Street gets ready for business

U.S. financial markets will re-open on Wednesday after being crippled for two days by the worst storm to hit New York City in 75 years. Even with the neighborhood surrounding the New York Stock Exchange still without power and parts under water, NYSE Euronext Chief Operating Officer Lawrence Leibowitz says it's time for Wall Street to get back to work. SOUNDBITE: LAWRENCE LEIBOWITZ, CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER, NYSE EURONEXT (ENGLISH) SAYING BY PHONE: "The world is looking at the U.S. financial markets and in many ways the world is looking at the New York Stock Exchange. When you turn on the television that's what you see and we need to prove that the markets are operating and functioning and people can do their business and capital can flow and all those things happen and so that every day that ticks by makes it feel like, what's going on here?" The decision to re-open was not the NYSE's alone. Conversations and testing have been going on all day. Its cross-town rival, The Nasdaq is on board, and so are the Wall Street firms who have been pushed out of their normal trading floors by the disaster. SOUNDBITE: LAWRENCE LEIBOWITZ, CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER, NYSE EURONEXT (ENGLISH) SAYING BY PHONE: "We want to make sure that our customers can actually get to us. So sometimes that could be our side, so maybe we have a Verizon problem coming into the building, sometimes it could be their side and we want to make sure that everybody has gone in and tested all of their routes and their alternate routes to make sure they have a way to get to us. We were doing both of those test plans at once." But there's more to saving face here. The exchanges are losing $1 million a day, according to Sandler O'Neill. And there's a lot of information to trade on for the rest of the week says, Craig Dismuke, Senior VP of Vining Sparks in Memphis, Tennessee. SOUNDBITE: CRAIG DISMUKE, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, VINING SPARKS (ENGLISH) SAYING: "For example, Thursday's ADP report on employment, the ISM manufacturing report on Thursday, Friday's employment data and so its, we like to, it wouldn't be ideal to have three days where we are closed and then get that much economic data coming in and have a lot of pent up trading, I think you could see a lot of volatility." And there's one more important reason the doors of the NYSE and equity markets need to be open on Wednesday. It's the end of the month and the end of the fiscal year for many mutual funds, and portfolio managers need to make those final trades. The question remains, with NYC's infrastructure still hobbled will there be enough hands on deck to handle any technical snafus?


14. P&G, Honeywell Boost Wall Street

  • Duration: 32
  • Channel: news
P&G, Honeywell Boost Wall Street

(Reuters) - U.S. stock futures ticked higher on Friday as a handful of major U.S. corporations beat results forecasts, offsetting concerns about political and growth risks in Europe, China and Saudi Arabia that drove a 1 percent fall a day earlier. Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., October 18, 2018.


15. P&G, Honeywell Boost Wall Street

  • Duration: 32
  • Channel: news
P&G, Honeywell Boost Wall Street

(Reuters) - U.S. stock futures ticked higher on Friday as a handful of major U.S. corporations beat results forecasts, offsetting concerns about political and growth risks in Europe, China and Saudi Arabia that drove a 1 percent fall a day earlier. Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., October 18, 2018.


16. Happy Phirr Bhag Jayegi | Full Hindi Movie | PART 1 | Sonakshi Sinha Harpreet Kaur Jassi Gill

  • Duration: 1286
  • Channel: shortfilms
Happy Phirr Bhag Jayegi | Full Hindi Movie | PART 1 | Sonakshi Sinha Harpreet Kaur  Jassi Gill

Jimmy, Sonakshi, Jassi and Piyush Mishra in Happy Phirr Bhag Jayegi (Image courtesy: aslisona ) Cast: Sonakshi Sinha, Jimmy Sheirgill, Jassi Gill, Piyush Mishra, Diana Penty and Ali Fazal Director: Mudassar Aziz Rating: One and a half stars This caper flick can't make do with one Happy. So it has two of them. Does that yield double the fun? No. Riding on a screenplay that yo-yos wildly between the utterly inane and the overly contrived, two's a crowd in Happy Phirr Bhag Jayegi. One Happy (Sonakshi Sinha) does all the running. The other (Diana Penty, this time in a special appearance) flits in and out of the picture in a completely random manner. The result is anything but happy. Not that Sonakshi does not give the role her best shot. Hers is a lively star turn. It might have buoyed up the film if only it had the comic energy to go the distance. It doesn't get too far because it merely runs around in circles. Its gags are gratuitous and the one-liners too vacuous to hit home. When the two namesakes, after much listless huffing and puffing that sees them encounter old and new friends and confront sly foes, come face to face in Shanghai, Happy No. 1 promises Happy No. 2 that their next meeting back in Amritsar would be in less confusing and more relaxed circumstances. We aren't sure we are looking forward to it. Another Phirr would be one too many. The sluggish, singularly unfunny Happy Phirr Bhag Jayegi, a follow-up to 2016's frisky Happy Bhag Jayegi in which the eponymous runaway bride had ended up in Lahore and a right royal mess, serves up a convoluted version of Chinese 'chukkers' that does not raise as much as a few mild chuckles. Happy Phirr Bhag Jayegi unfolds in China, where key characters from the first film are joined by an Indian embassy man from Patiala (played by Punjabi singer-actor Jassi Gill in his Bollywood debut) even as a suave non-resident Pakistani gentleman - that is what he appears to be on the face of it - causes them no end of trouble. This wolf in sheep's clothing - his name is Adnan Chow and his Urdu is to die for - is played by Denzil Smith with self-effacing detachment. His refined performance is one of the few things that works in Happy Phirr Bhag Jayegi. oskcs948 About the only time the film strikes a passably droll note is when Jimmy Sheirgill, in a meta-textual context, ticks off Jassi Gill for preening over his family name. 'You are Gill, but I am Sheirgill', the former retorts. Gentle bluster has its uses even in a film as lacklustre as this one. Sheirgill has obvious bragging rights in this comedy written and directed by Mudassar Aziz. He has been here before, playing a small-time politician thwarted in his plans to marry the female protagonist. This time around, however, he is reduced to the status of a mere hanger-on, strutting around spouting banalities and eventually settling for a tame "yeh bhi theek hai" in most exchanges with Usman Afridi (Piyush Mishra) or Jassi Gill's character Khushwant Sing


17. President Moon urges expansion of reunions for separated families

  • Duration: 157
  • Channel: news
President Moon urges expansion of reunions for separated families

During a meeting with his top aides on Monday, President Moon Jae-in stressed the reunion of separated families must become a regular event. He also called for greater efforts to create more jobs in South Korea as the unemployment rate remains stubbornly high and continues to tick up. Hwang Hojun reports. According to the South Korean President, Seoul and Pyongyang have to act boldly to expand and speed up the reunions of separated families,... calling it a top priority among the humanitarian projects the two Koreas must undertake together. "South and North must take measures to expand reunions. Not only regular events like this, but reunions by video conferencing, a permanent center for reunions, letter exchanges and visits to hometowns." President Moon said he himself is part of a separated family, and he noted that about 56-thousand South Koreans are still waiting to be reunited with their families in the North. In his regular meeting Monday with his top aides, President Moon called for speedy efforts in view of the old age of many of the people on both sides. Since 2013, an average of 36-hundred members of the separated families have died each year. As for the worsening job situation in South Korea, President Moon admitted the latest figures were disappointing. "The government has been running its finance and policies to create better quality jobs, which has been the center of our administration. But we have to admit, according to the results, they were insufficient." That comment comes a day after Statistics Korea released a report saying the unemployment rate rose to 3.7 percent in July, up 3 tenths of a percentage point from the same month last year. Only 5,000 jobs were added over the same period,... marking the lowest increase since January of 2010. The report card prompted criticism of the Moon administration's push to raise the minimum wage and to create new jobs in the public sector as part of its policy of income-led growth. However, President Moon blamed structural factors such as the nation's demographic challenges, industrial restructuring, and automation, saying the government will spend more to support job creation. He also asked his top aides to come up with measures to speed up innovation in regulation and to make the economy more fair in order to increase investment and employment in the private sector. Hwang Hojun, Arirang News.


18. South Korea's export and import prices rise in July

  • Duration: 95
  • Channel: news
South Korea's export and import prices rise in July

The Bank of Korea has released its data on South Korea's export and import prices for last month. Our business correspondent Kim Hye-sung reports. South Korea's import prices increased for the seventh consecutive month in July due to the weakening Korean won. The Bank of Korea says the import price index rose one-point-seven percent on-month, recording 89-point-eight-one in July, the highest monthly figure since November 2014. Compared to the same period last year, the index is up more than twelve percent. The local currency weakened against the U.S. dollar, recording an average of one-thousand-1-hundred-22-point-eight won last month, pushing up Korea's import prices despite a slight fall in global oil prices. In particular, intermediate goods prices increased more than two percent on-month on rising coal and chemical goods prices. Without the change in the won-dollar exchange rate, the Bank of Korea says July's import prices would've ticked down zero-point-eight percent on-month. Export prices rose two-point-three percent on-month to 87-point-five-six. "Export prices rose on the back of the weakening Korean won and the strong U.S. dollar. Export prices, especially of industrial goods like metals and machinery,... went up." "The Bank of Korea says export and import prices -- import prices in particular -- affect future consumer prices, so this could mean higher inflation in the months to come. Kim Hyesung, Arirang News."


19. South Korea's export and import prices rise in July

  • Duration: 92
  • Channel: news
South Korea's export and import prices rise in July

The Bank of Korea has released its data on South Korea's export and import prices for last month. It showed both indexes are on the rise. Our business correspondent Kim Hye-sung reports. South Korea's import prices increased for the seventh consecutive month in July due to the weakening Korean won. The Bank of Korea says the import price index rose one-point-seven percent on-month, recording 89-point-eight-one in July, the highest monthly figure since November 2014. Compared to the same period last year, the index is up more than twelve percent. The local currency weakened against the U.S. dollar, recording an average of one-thousand-1-hundred-22-point-eight won last month, pushing up Korea's import prices despite a slight fall in global oil prices. In particular, intermediate goods prices increased more than two percent on-month on rising coal and chemical goods prices. Without the change in the won-dollar exchange rate, the Bank of Korea says July's import prices would've ticked down zero-point-eight percent on-month. Export prices rose two-point-three percent on-month to 87-point-five-six. The central bank attributes the rising export prices to an increase in industrial goods' prices, including metals and machinery. Export and import prices affect future consumer prices, so this could mean higher inflation in the months to come. Kim Hyesung, Arirang News.


20. South Korea's export and import prices rise in July

  • Duration: 93
  • Channel: news
South Korea's export and import prices rise in July

The Bank of Korea has released its data on South Korea's export and import prices for last month. It showed both indexes are on the rise. Our business correspondent Kim Hye-sung reports. South Korea's import prices increased for the seventh consecutive month in July due to the weakening Korean won. The Bank of Korea says the import price index rose one-point-seven percent on-month, recording 89-point-eight-one in July. Compared to the same period last year, the index is up more than twelve percent, marking the biggest jump in 18 months. The local currency weakened against the U.S. dollar, recording an average of one-thousand-1-hundred-22-point-eight won last month, pushing up Korea's import prices despite a slight fall in global oil prices. In particular, intermediate goods prices increased more than two percent on-month on rising coal and chemical goods prices. Without the change in the won-dollar exchange rate, the Bank of Korea says July's import prices would've ticked down zero-point-eight percent on-month. Export prices rose two-point-three percent on-month to 87-point-five-six, continuing their upward streak for a fourth straight month. The central bank attributes the rising export prices to an increase in industrial goods' prices, including metals and machinery. Export and import prices affect future consumer prices, so this could mean higher inflation in the months to come. Kim Hyesung, Arirang News.