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1. "Stella By Starlight"- Joe McPhee Quintet (clip)

  • Published: 2013-10-11T20:02:52Z
  • By cvsd

Poughkeepsie, NY, multi-instrumentalist Joe McPhee organized a great double-bill at Vassar College in 1970, featuring himself and his local underground jazz peers. One discs in the 2-CD package of previously unreleased music consists of a complete set of music by McPhee's quintet - wild and deeply soulful free jazz quite close in spirit to McPhee's legendary debut, NATION TIME, with clear connections to Pharoah Sanders; on the second disc, a simmering Hammond B-3 set introduces the Ernie Bostic Quartet and serves as an on-the-ground, in-the-crib soul-jazz foil to McPhee's political and astral explorations. Recorded April 30, 1970 Ernie Bostic Quartet: Ernie Bostic, Otis Greene, Herbie Leaman and Charlie Benjamin Joe McPhee Quintet: Joe McPhee, Byron Morris, Mike Kull, Tyrone Crabb and Bruce Thompson 2-CD set, released 2011 CvsDcd006a UPC: 610079000000

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2. "Quiet The Thunder Bells" - Rob Mazurek (clip)

  • Published: 2014-04-04T19:57:32Z
  • By cvsd

"This is not free music. This is contained music. Music performance as a container for grief and joy. Literally, this is container music - a box from which items are extricated and played. Rob Mazurek taking shakers and blowers from a perfect cube, to mourn and celebrate the passing of his mother two months back. He came prepared with a small squadron of 40 handmade airplanes, affixed as assemblages to pieces of paper on which Mazurek had deposited a poem, in memoriam. All this, and still we didn't expect the power of the hour. Nobody did, maybe least of all Rob. He said nothing, no dedication. Or maybe complete dedication, wordless. Flashes of lyricism, brilliance, and stretches of duration performance, repeated action, incantation. One by one, pulling things out of the box, in the end the container itself became the instrument. Hoisted over his head, it was shaken, contents rapping against wood, repeated until the arms would no longer respect their instructions. Not usually at a loss for words, we did not know what to say. Drenched, Rob thanked everyone for listening, move to the back of the gallery, in a sort of trance. Having stood still, the day started up again. Each of us was still enclosed in our personal little containers, but somehow we could hear them rattle." - John Corbett

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3. "Sound On Sound"- Joe McPhee (clip)

  • Published: 2013-10-18T19:32:21Z
  • By cvsd

Sound on Sound is a two-CD set of these previously unreleased solo recordings by Poughkeepsie, NY, multi-instrumentalist Joe McPhee, dating from 1968 to 1973. The extraordinary tracks document the very early years of McPhee's tenor playing (he was intitally a trumpet player, though he was an absolute natural saxophonist) and his omnivorous interest in sound-making devices of all types (from drone organ to nagoya harp, by way of soprano sax and hand percussion). They present a little-known aspect of his early work, his interest in multi-track recording, here executed on a device known as a Sound On Sound tape machine. When he performed live in concert with the device, he called it his "Survival Unit." McPhee aficionados will particularly enjoy the new-old soul/free jazz classic "Cosmic Love." Featuring McPhee solo on tenor saxophone, toy piano, toy percussion, recorder, soprano saxophone, Space Organ, flute, feedback, kalimba, echoplex, and percussion. Recorded 1968/69 and 1970/73 McPhee solo on tenor saxophone, toy piano, toy percussion, recorder, soprano saxophone, Space Organ, flute, feedback, kalimba, echoplex, and percussion 2 CD set Released 2010 cvsdcd005

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4. "Percussion Number One"- Joe McPhee (clip)

  • Published: 2013-10-18T19:33:47Z
  • By cvsd

Sound on Sound is a two-CD set of these previously unreleased solo recordings by Poughkeepsie, NY, multi-instrumentalist Joe McPhee, dating from 1968 to 1973. The extraordinary tracks document the very early years of McPhee's tenor playing (he was intitally a trumpet player, though he was an absolute natural saxophonist) and his omnivorous interest in sound-making devices of all types (from drone organ to nagoya harp, by way of soprano sax and hand percussion). They present a little-known aspect of his early work, his interest in multi-track recording, here executed on a device known as a Sound On Sound tape machine. When he performed live in concert with the device, he called it his "Survival Unit." McPhee aficionados will particularly enjoy the new-old soul/free jazz classic "Cosmic Love." Featuring McPhee solo on tenor saxophone, toy piano, toy percussion, recorder, soprano saxophone, Space Organ, flute, feedback, kalimba, echoplex, and percussion. Recorded 1968/69 and 1970/73 McPhee solo on tenor saxophone, toy piano, toy percussion, recorder, soprano saxophone, Space Organ, flute, feedback, kalimba, echoplex, and percussion 2 CD set Released 2010 cvsdcd005

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5. "Mic Feedback Two"- Joe McPhee (clip)

  • Published: 2013-10-18T19:33:24Z
  • By cvsd

Sound on Sound is a two-CD set of these previously unreleased solo recordings by Poughkeepsie, NY, multi-instrumentalist Joe McPhee, dating from 1968 to 1973. The extraordinary tracks document the very early years of McPhee's tenor playing (he was intitally a trumpet player, though he was an absolute natural saxophonist) and his omnivorous interest in sound-making devices of all types (from drone organ to nagoya harp, by way of soprano sax and hand percussion). They present a little-known aspect of his early work, his interest in multi-track recording, here executed on a device known as a Sound On Sound tape machine. When he performed live in concert with the device, he called it his "Survival Unit." McPhee aficionados will particularly enjoy the new-old soul/free jazz classic "Cosmic Love." Featuring McPhee solo on tenor saxophone, toy piano, toy percussion, recorder, soprano saxophone, Space Organ, flute, feedback, kalimba, echoplex, and percussion. Recorded 1968/69 and 1970/73 McPhee solo on tenor saxophone, toy piano, toy percussion, recorder, soprano saxophone, Space Organ, flute, feedback, kalimba, echoplex, and percussion 2 CD set Released 2010 cvsdcd005

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6. "Untitled"- Joe McPhee (clip)

  • Published: 2013-10-25T19:48:57Z
  • By cvsd

In 1970, multi-instrumentalist Joe McPhee waxed one of the landmark free-funk records: Nation Time. Recorded in concert at Vassar College and originally released on McPhee's own CjR label, Nation Time culled elements of post-Coltrane spiritual jazz, greasy organ funk, and expressive R&B into a previously unknown brand of Poughkeepsie stew. When the LP was finally reissued on CD a dozen years ago, it became an instant hit, drawing fans from the British soul scene and denizens of free jazz alike, introducing a new generation to Mr. McPhee's powerful statement, still brimming with sweat and humanity thirty years after its birth. After working on it for five years, Corbett vs. Dempsey is proud to release Nation Time: The Complete Recordings, a deluxe 4-disc box set featuring all the music leading up to and around the seminal LP. With 17 tracks previously unreleased on CD, most of which have never been issued at all, the set provides an expansive picture of the vibrant up-state NY free jazz/new thing scene, centered as it was on Joe McPhee. Lavishly packaged, with a booklet containing an extensive conversation between John Corbett and Joe McPhee and many previously unpublished photographs, Nation Time: The Complete Recordings also helps contextualize the original LP, exploring the special milieu in which tracks like “Shaky Jake” and “Scorpio's Dance” took shape. Along with the LP, complete and re-mastered, Nation Time: The Complete Recordings presents additional tracks recorded during the original 2-day performances in December 1970, including a version of James Brown's “Cold Sweat,” as well as the full LP Black Magic Man, which was released on vinyl as the very first issue of the fledgling Hat Hut record label in 1975, but has never been reissued on CD. Two fascinating concert recordings from 1969 are released here for the first time, one featuring McPhee on trumpet playing jazz standards including “My Funny Valentine,” “Milestones,” and “Bag's Groove,” and the other, recorded at a local bar called the Paddock, including the first incarnation of what would become the track “Nation Time.” This box set cuts direct to the heart of 1970s jazz-funk expression, with all the passion, intrigue, and tenderness the world has come to expect from Joe McPhee. Here it is in all its germinal, previously unheard glory. What time is it? You know what time it is. Once again, it's Nation Time!

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7. "Comin' On" - George Davis (clip)

  • Published: 2014-04-04T20:56:25Z
  • By cvsd

Alto and tenor saxophonist George Davis is an enigmatic figure, best known for leading the band in which Jackie & Roy met. Young singer Jackie Cain met pianist Roy Krall in the mid-40's, playing together under Davis at a club on the south side of Chicago called Jump Town. As the George Davis Quartet, they cut two 78-rpm records for Aristocrat that followed Davis into obscurity. In 1948/49, Jackie & Roy went on to work with Charlie Ventura. At the same time, Davis cut a group of acetate sides with an unnamed band, music that was rediscovered a few years ago. Awkwardly announced as if there was an audience, these privately recorded bop and r&b sides are pure Chicago jazz, hot, swinging, and bristling with attitude. Another lovely missive from the dustbin of music history.

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8. "The Beginning Of"- Sun Ra (clip)

  • Published: 2013-10-11T17:12:45Z
  • By cvsd

A special 2-CD reissue of the hyper-rare El Saturn LP, recorded in 1963, early in the Arkestra's NY period, paired with a full disc of extra material. Loaded with John Gilmore, one of the greatest & rarest slabs of Sun Ra vinyl, on disc for the first time! Recorded March 10, 1963, Choreographer's Workshop, New York City. Remastered from the original tapes by Michael D. Anderson. Design by Sonnenzimmer. Reissue produced by John Corbett and Adam Abraham. 2CD, released 2013 cvsdcd009

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9. "Cosmic Rays/The Next Stop Mars"- Sun Ra (clip)

  • Published: 2013-10-11T17:12:36Z
  • By cvsd

A special 2-CD reissue of the hyper-rare El Saturn LP, recorded in 1963, early in the Arkestra's NY period, paired with a full disc of extra material. Loaded with John Gilmore, one of the greatest & rarest slabs of Sun Ra vinyl, on disc for the first time! Recorded March 10, 1963, Choreographer's Workshop, New York City. Remastered from the original tapes by Michael D. Anderson. Design by Sonnenzimmer. Reissue produced by John Corbett and Adam Abraham. 2CD, released 2013 cvsdcd009

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10. "Meteor Shower"- Sun Ra (clip)

  • Published: 2013-10-11T17:13:02Z
  • By cvsd

A special 2-CD reissue of the hyper-rare El Saturn LP, recorded in 1963, early in the Arkestra's NY period, paired with a full disc of extra material. Loaded with John Gilmore, one of the greatest & rarest slabs of Sun Ra vinyl, on disc for the first time! Recorded March 10, 1963, Choreographer's Workshop, New York City. Remastered from the original tapes by Michael D. Anderson. Design by Sonnenzimmer. Reissue produced by John Corbett and Adam Abraham. 2CD, released 2013 cvsdcd009

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11. "Nation Time"- Joe McPhee (clip)

  • Published: 2013-10-25T19:49:28Z
  • By cvsd

n 1970, multi-instrumentalist Joe McPhee waxed one of the landmark free-funk records: Nation Time. Recorded in concert at Vassar College and originally released on McPhee's own CjR label, Nation Time culled elements of post-Coltrane spiritual jazz, greasy organ funk, and expressive R&B into a previously unknown brand of Poughkeepsie stew. When the LP was finally reissued on CD a dozen years ago, it became an instant hit, drawing fans from the British soul scene and denizens of free jazz alike, introducing a new generation to Mr. McPhee's powerful statement, still brimming with sweat and humanity thirty years after its birth. After working on it for five years, Corbett vs. Dempsey is proud to release Nation Time: The Complete Recordings, a deluxe 4-disc box set featuring all the music leading up to and around the seminal LP. With 17 tracks previously unreleased on CD, most of which have never been issued at all, the set provides an expansive picture of the vibrant up-state NY free jazz/new thing scene, centered as it was on Joe McPhee. Lavishly packaged, with a booklet containing an extensive conversation between John Corbett and Joe McPhee and many previously unpublished photographs, Nation Time: The Complete Recordings also helps contextualize the original LP, exploring the special milieu in which tracks like “Shaky Jake” and “Scorpio's Dance” took shape. Along with the LP, complete and re-mastered, Nation Time: The Complete Recordings presents additional tracks recorded during the original 2-day performances in December 1970, including a version of James Brown's “Cold Sweat,” as well as the full LP Black Magic Man, which was released on vinyl as the very first issue of the fledgling Hat Hut record label in 1975, but has never been reissued on CD. Two fascinating concert recordings from 1969 are released here for the first time, one featuring McPhee on trumpet playing jazz standards including “My Funny Valentine,” “Milestones,” and “Bag's Groove,” and the other, recorded at a local bar called the Paddock, including the first incarnation of what would become the track “Nation Time.” This box set cuts direct to the heart of 1970s jazz-funk expression, with all the passion, intrigue, and tenderness the world has come to expect from Joe McPhee. Here it is in all its germinal, previously unheard glory. What time is it? You know what time it is. Once again, it's Nation Time!

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12. "Angels / Spirits" - Mats Gustafsson(clip)

  • Published: 2014-04-04T20:41:38Z
  • By cvsd

Compositions by Duke Ellington, Albert Ayler, and Lars Gullin "I finally gave a listen to those LPs and the CD you sent me of your own saxophone playing and some Swedish modern jazz. I gotta tell you, on the cover of the CD of your sax playing, which is black, and has no text on it, I wrote in large block letters, in silver ink, "torturing the saxophone -- Mats Gustafsson." I just totally fail to find anything enjoyable about this, or to see what this has to do with music as I understand it, or what in God's name is going on in your head that you would want to make such noises on a musical instrument. Quite frankly, I was kind of shocked at what a negative, unpleasant experience it was, listening to it. i had to take it off long before it reached the end. I just don't get it. I don't understand what this is about. You actually go on TOUR with that stuff. Wow. People actually...sit... and... LISTEN...to that. I mean, they voluntarily go to the place, maybe even PAY... PAY to hear that stuff. And then they sit there, quietly, politely...and LISTEN. Unbelievable. I should go myself sometime and see this. Witness it with my own eyes. I don't say these things to with the intention to insult you. You seem to be a perfectly nice, civilized guy with a good sense of humor. I am speaking the plain truth of my reaction to the records and CD you sent. That this noise could give anyone any aesthetic pleasure is beyond my comprehension, truly. Is this the logical end of improvisational music Is this where it ends up? Where does it go from this point? Is there any audience for this "free jazz" besides other guys who play it and maybe their wives who must patiently endure it? I just don't get it/ Am I too un-hip? Am I a square from Delaware? A hick from Battle Crick? A Shmuck from Keokuck?" - R. Crumb

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13. "The Breath Of Life You Gave To Me" - Rob Mazurek (clip)

  • Published: 2014-04-04T19:51:56Z
  • By cvsd

"This is not free music. This is contained music. Music performance as a container for grief and joy. Literally, this is container music - a box from which items are extricated and played. Rob Mazurek taking shakers and blowers from a perfect cube, to mourn and celebrate the passing of his mother two months back. He came prepared with a small squadron of 40 handmade airplanes, affixed as assemblages to pieces of paper on which Mazurek had deposited a poem, in memoriam. All this, and still we didn't expect the power of the hour. Nobody did, maybe least of all Rob. He said nothing, no dedication. Or maybe complete dedication, wordless. Flashes of lyricism, brilliance, and stretches of duration performance, repeated action, incantation. One by one, pulling things out of the box, in the end the container itself became the instrument. Hoisted over his head, it was shaken, contents rapping against wood, repeated until the arms would no longer respect their instructions. Not usually at a loss for words, we did not know what to say. Drenched, Rob thanked everyone for listening, move to the back of the gallery, in a sort of trance. Having stood still, the day started up again. Each of us was still enclosed in our personal little containers, but somehow we could hear them rattle." - John Corbett

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14. "Glasses"- Joe McPhee (clip)

  • Published: 2013-10-11T21:10:05Z
  • By cvsd

Glasses was recorded in October, 1977, during a highly significant period in McPhee's work, as he was pioneering the transatlantic, collaborative spirit that has helped to define the last three decades of his career. Documented in Tavannes, Switzerland, the set contains sensational tenor work, including the title piece, which finds McPhee ringing out a rhythm on a half-full wine glass, from which he extrapolates a melody on the saxophone, as well as a stunning version of John Coltrane's "Naima." The final 15 minutes are spent in duet with the Swiss percussionist Reto Weber, who was so inspired by McPhee he asked to sit in and did so with his quite extensive battery of drums. This record come from a year-long run during which McPhee recorded and released four very different, extremely wonderful solo records, of which only Tenor has ever been reissued on CD. Along with the LP Variations on a Blue Line/'Round Midnight, this reissue was produced in collaboration with the seminal Swiss label Hat Hut Records and their chief, Werner X. Uehlinger, and was originally released in 1979. Recorded live by Werner X. Uehlinger, October 13, 1977 at Cafe Calvado, Switzerland. Joe McPhee on tenor saxophone, flugelhorn, and percussion with Reto Weber also on percussion. CD, released 2012 cvsdcd006

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15. "Variations on a Blue Line (After a Theme for Knox)"- Joe McPhee (clip)

  • Published: 2013-10-11T21:39:18Z
  • By cvsd

Variations on a Blue Line/'Round Midnight was recorded in October, 1977, during a highly significant period in Poughkeespie, NY, multi-instrumentalist Joe McPhee's work, as he was pioneering the transatlantic, collaborative spirit that has helped to define the last three decades of his career. Blue Line comes from a concert in Rouen, France, when McPhee played on a double bill with the Peter Brötzmann/Han Bennink duo. It features the side-length tenor excursion "Beanstalk" (dedicated to Coleman Hawkins), an alternate version of "Knox" (known from his beloved LP Tenor), and two soprano pieces, "Motian Studies" and Thelonious Monk's "'Round Midnight." This record come from a year-long run during which McPhee recorded and released four very different, extremely wonderful solo records, of which only Tenor has ever been reissued on CD. Along with the LP Glasses, this reissue was produced in collaboration with the seminal Swiss label Hat Hut Records and their chief, Werner X. Uehlinger (originally released in 1979). Recorded live by Claude Robert October 11, 1977 at Salle Ste Croix des Pelletiers in Rouen, France. Joe McPhee on tenor and soprano saxophone. 1-disc, released 2012 cvsdcd007

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16. "Green Dolphin Street"- Joe McPhee Quintet (clip)

  • Published: 2013-10-11T20:42:07Z
  • By cvsd

Poughkeepsie, NY, multi-instrumentalist Joe McPhee organized a great double-bill at Vassar College in 1970, featuring himself and his local underground jazz peers. One discs in the 2-CD package of previously unreleased music consists of a complete set of music by McPhee's quintet - wild and deeply soulful free jazz quite close in spirit to McPhee's legendary debut, NATION TIME, with clear connections to Pharoah Sanders; on the second disc, a simmering Hammond B-3 set introduces the Ernie Bostic Quartet and serves as an on-the-ground, in-the-crib soul-jazz foil to McPhee's political and astral explorations. Recorded April 30, 1970 Ernie Bostic Quartet: Ernie Bostic, Otis Greene, Herbie Leaman and Charlie Benjamin Joe McPhee Quintet: Joe McPhee, Byron Morris, Mike Kull, Tyrone Crabb and Bruce Thompson 2-CD set, released 2011 CvsDcd006a UPC: 610079000000

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17. "Naima"- Joe McPhee (clip)

  • Published: 2013-10-11T21:10:08Z
  • By cvsd

Glasses was recorded in October, 1977, during a highly significant period in McPhee's work, as he was pioneering the transatlantic, collaborative spirit that has helped to define the last three decades of his career. Documented in Tavannes, Switzerland, the set contains sensational tenor work, including the title piece, which finds McPhee ringing out a rhythm on a half-full wine glass, from which he extrapolates a melody on the saxophone, as well as a stunning version of John Coltrane's "Naima." The final 15 minutes are spent in duet with the Swiss percussionist Reto Weber, who was so inspired by McPhee he asked to sit in and did so with his quite extensive battery of drums. This record come from a year-long run during which McPhee recorded and released four very different, extremely wonderful solo records, of which only Tenor has ever been reissued on CD. Along with the LP Variations on a Blue Line/'Round Midnight, this reissue was produced in collaboration with the seminal Swiss label Hat Hut Records and their chief, Werner X. Uehlinger, and was originally released in 1979. Recorded live by Werner X. Uehlinger, October 13, 1977 at Cafe Calvado, Switzerland. Joe McPhee on tenor saxophone, flugelhorn, and percussion with Reto Weber also on percussion. CD, released 2012 cvsdcd006

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18. "Black Magic Man"- Joe McPhee (clip)

  • Published: 2013-10-25T19:48:51Z
  • By cvsd

In 1970, multi-instrumentalist Joe McPhee waxed one of the landmark free-funk records: Nation Time. Recorded in concert at Vassar College and originally released on McPhee's own CjR label, Nation Time culled elements of post-Coltrane spiritual jazz, greasy organ funk, and expressive R&B into a previously unknown brand of Poughkeepsie stew. When the LP was finally reissued on CD a dozen years ago, it became an instant hit, drawing fans from the British soul scene and denizens of free jazz alike, introducing a new generation to Mr. McPhee's powerful statement, still brimming with sweat and humanity thirty years after its birth. After working on it for five years, Corbett vs. Dempsey is proud to release Nation Time: The Complete Recordings, a deluxe 4-disc box set featuring all the music leading up to and around the seminal LP. With 17 tracks previously unreleased on CD, most of which have never been issued at all, the set provides an expansive picture of the vibrant up-state NY free jazz/new thing scene, centered as it was on Joe McPhee. Lavishly packaged, with a booklet containing an extensive conversation between John Corbett and Joe McPhee and many previously unpublished photographs, Nation Time: The Complete Recordings also helps contextualize the original LP, exploring the special milieu in which tracks like “Shaky Jake” and “Scorpio's Dance” took shape. Along with the LP, complete and re-mastered, Nation Time: The Complete Recordings presents additional tracks recorded during the original 2-day performances in December 1970, including a version of James Brown's “Cold Sweat,” as well as the full LP Black Magic Man, which was released on vinyl as the very first issue of the fledgling Hat Hut record label in 1975, but has never been reissued on CD. Two fascinating concert recordings from 1969 are released here for the first time, one featuring McPhee on trumpet playing jazz standards including “My Funny Valentine,” “Milestones,” and “Bag's Groove,” and the other, recorded at a local bar called the Paddock, including the first incarnation of what would become the track “Nation Time.” This box set cuts direct to the heart of 1970s jazz-funk expression, with all the passion, intrigue, and tenderness the world has come to expect from Joe McPhee. Here it is in all its germinal, previously unheard glory. What time is it? You know what time it is. Once again, it's Nation Time!

nothing at of , which is


19. "Untitled"- Joe McPhee (clip)

  • Published: 2013-10-25T19:49:08Z
  • By cvsd

In 1970, multi-instrumentalist Joe McPhee waxed one of the landmark free-funk records: Nation Time. Recorded in concert at Vassar College and originally released on McPhee's own CjR label, Nation Time culled elements of post-Coltrane spiritual jazz, greasy organ funk, and expressive R&B into a previously unknown brand of Poughkeepsie stew. When the LP was finally reissued on CD a dozen years ago, it became an instant hit, drawing fans from the British soul scene and denizens of free jazz alike, introducing a new generation to Mr. McPhee's powerful statement, still brimming with sweat and humanity thirty years after its birth. After working on it for five years, Corbett vs. Dempsey is proud to release Nation Time: The Complete Recordings, a deluxe 4-disc box set featuring all the music leading up to and around the seminal LP. With 17 tracks previously unreleased on CD, most of which have never been issued at all, the set provides an expansive picture of the vibrant up-state NY free jazz/new thing scene, centered as it was on Joe McPhee. Lavishly packaged, with a booklet containing an extensive conversation between John Corbett and Joe McPhee and many previously unpublished photographs, Nation Time: The Complete Recordings also helps contextualize the original LP, exploring the special milieu in which tracks like “Shaky Jake” and “Scorpio's Dance” took shape. Along with the LP, complete and re-mastered, Nation Time: The Complete Recordings presents additional tracks recorded during the original 2-day performances in December 1970, including a version of James Brown's “Cold Sweat,” as well as the full LP Black Magic Man, which was released on vinyl as the very first issue of the fledgling Hat Hut record label in 1975, but has never been reissued on CD. Two fascinating concert recordings from 1969 are released here for the first time, one featuring McPhee on trumpet playing jazz standards including “My Funny Valentine,” “Milestones,” and “Bag's Groove,” and the other, recorded at a local bar called the Paddock, including the first incarnation of what would become the track “Nation Time.” This box set cuts direct to the heart of 1970s jazz-funk expression, with all the passion, intrigue, and tenderness the world has come to expect from Joe McPhee. Here it is in all its germinal, previously unheard glory. What time is it? You know what time it is. Once again, it's Nation Time!

nothing at of , which is