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1. A Singing Comet

A Singing Comet

UPDATE (20 Aug 2015): What made the comet sing? Scientists working on Rosetta's RPC instrument have found out why 67P/C-G was singing. Via http://wp.me/p46DHN-1nN == ORIGINAL Citation (Oct 2014): Rosetta’s Plasma Consortium (RPC) has uncovered a mysterious ‘song’ that Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is singing into space. The comet seems to be emitting a ‘song’ in the form of oscillations in the magnetic field in the comet’s environment. It is being sung at 40-50 millihertz, far below human hearing, which typically picks up sound between 20 Hz and 20 kHz. To make the music audible to the human ear, the frequencies have been increased in this recording. This sonification of the RPC-Mag data was compiled by German composer Manuel Senfft (www.tagirijus.de). Read full details in ESA's Rosetta blog: http://wp.me/p46DHN-Li Copyright Notice Original Data Credit: ESA/Rosetta/RPC/RPC-MAG Sonification: TU Braunschweig/IGEP/Manuel Senfft, CC-BY-NC-SA 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ Thumbnail image credit: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0

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2. International Space Station siren

International Space Station siren

Ever wonder how the International Space Station alarms sounds? This emergency alert is the last thing astronauts on the ISS ever want to hear as they work 400 km above Earth in the vacuum of space. This sound was sent to us by the Columbus Control Centre, near München, Germany, the operations centre for ESA astronauts and the Columbus laboratory, part of the orbiting weightless research centre. The alarm is sounded on the International Space Station to alert astronauts to life-threatening emergencies such as loss of pressure or fire. The astronauts would immediately convene near their Soyuz spacecraft that serve as lifeboats, but these kind of emergencies are extremely rare and the alarm has sounded only a handful of times despite the Space Station having been inhabited since 2000. Most astronauts on a six-month space flight will only ever hear the sound during a practice session. Regular 'fire-drills' are performed to make sure that even in a worst-case scenario everybody knows what to do. Mission controllers from the international partners that run the Space Station in Russia, USA, Europe and Japan re-enact scenarios with the astronauts in space. In critical situations the teams on ground need to communicate efficiently, act quickly and coordinate a solution between each other and the astronauts flying 400 km above them. Image credit: ESA/NASA Audio credit: ESA, CC BY-SA IGO 3.0 http://www.esa.int/Services/Creative_Commons_Attribution-ShareAlike_3.0_IGO_CC_BY-SA_3.0_IGO_Licence https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/

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3. Philae touchdown makes a thud

Philae touchdown makes a thud

Sensors in the feet of Rosetta’s lander Philae have recorded the sound of touchdown as it first came into contact with Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The instrument, SESAME-CASSE, was turned on during the descent and clearly registered the first touchdown as Philae came into contact with the comet, in the form of vibrations detected in the soles of the lander’s feet. Technical note: This is the actual sound file; i.e. it is a recording of mechanical vibrations at acoustic frequencies. No modification was necessary except for some technical adjustments (e.g. the .wav format requires amplitude normalization). Actual frequency content and duration are unchanged. Read full details in ESA's Rosetta blog: http://wp.me/p46DHN-Sr CREDIT: ESA/Rosetta/Philae/SESAME/DLR (CC BY-SA IGO 3.0) This soundfile is licenced under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO (CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO) licence. The user is allowed to reproduce, distribute, adapt, translate and publicly perform this publication, without explicit permission, provided that the content is accompanied by an acknowledgement that the source is credited as 'ESA/Rosetta/Philae/SESAME/DLR', a direct link to the licence text is provided and that it is clearly indicated if changes were made to the original content. Adaptation/translation/derivatives must be distributed under the same licence terms as this publication. To view a copy of this license, please visit: creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/ Thumbnail image credit: ESA/ATG medialab Audio file credit: ESA/Rosetta/Philae/SESAME/DLR

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4. Huygens: Alien winds descent

Huygens: Alien winds descent

Audio data collected by the Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument (HASI), which includes an acoustic sensor, during Huygens' descent, 14 January 2005. This recording is a laboratory reconstruction of the sounds heard by Huygens' microphones. Several sound samples, taken at different times during the descent, are here combined together and give a realistic reproduction of what a traveller on board Huygens would have heard during one minute of the descent through Titan's atmosphere. Credit: ESA/NASA/ASI/HASI team (M. Fulchignoni)

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5. Mars Express flies by Phobos 29 Dec 2013

Mars Express flies by Phobos 29 Dec 2013

Audio recording of the Doppler shift in the high-frequency radio signals received from Mars Express by Bertrand Pinel, 29 December 2013, in his garden near Castelnaudary, France. Credit & Copyright (C) B. Pinel. Used by permission. Details via ESA's Mars Express blog http://wp.me/p2E5wN-aU

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6. Hear the lightning

Hear the lightning

Electromagnetic waves travelling upward from a lightning strike undergo dispersion in the ionosphere. High frequencies travel faster and arrive before the longer waves, giving rise to a whistling tone from high to low recorded by our magnetometer. Credits ESA/CNES/Leti/IPGP/Swarm DISC

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7. ARIANE 504 liftoff with ESA XMM-Newton

ARIANE 504 liftoff with ESA XMM-Newton

15 years in orbit: The world's most powerful observatory for X-ray astronomy, the European Space Agency's XMM satellite, set off into space from Kourou, French Guiana, at 15:32 CET on 10 December 1999. The mighty Ariane 5 launcher, making its very first commercial launch, hurled the 3.9-tonne spacecraft into a far-ranging orbit. Audio credit: ESA/CNES/Arianespace Image credit: ESA/CNES/Arianespace-Service Optique CSG

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8. Huygens Alien Descent Radar

Huygens Alien Descent Radar

This recording was produced by converting into audible sounds some of the radar echoes received by Huygens during the last few kilometres of its descent onto Titan. As the probe approaches the ground, both the pitch and intensity increase. Scientists used the intensity of the echoes to speculate about the nature of the surface. Image credit: ESA/NASA Audio: ESA/HASI (M. Fulchignoni), CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO

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9. Wailing Leonids

Wailing Leonids

Another gem from the ESA archives: Tracks left behind by the November 2000 Leonids shower, as detected by ESA scientists. Each time a meteor crosses the atmosphere, it leaves behind a short trail of ionised particles. This trail reflects high-frequency radio signals from stations around the world for just a few seconds. The motion of the meteor trail due to the upper atmosphere winds changes the frequency of the reflected signal (Doppler effect). You 'hear' the trail as it is blown around by the winds before it is eventually dispersed. You are invited to use, re-use or remix this sonification. When doing so, please credit 'ESA - European Space Agency, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO' and stick to the licence: This work is licenced under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO (CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO) licence. The user is allowed to reproduce, distribute, adapt, translate and publicly perform this publication, without explicit permission, provided that the content is accompanied by an acknowledgement that the source is credited as 'ESA - European Space Agency’, a direct link to the licence text is provided and that it is clearly indicated if changes were made to the original content. Adaptation/translation/derivatives must be distributed under the same licence terms as this publication. The user must not give any suggestion that ESA necessarily endorses the modifications that you have made. No warranties are given. The license may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material. Any of the above conditions can be waived if you get permission from ESA. To view a copy of this license, please visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/ Source: http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Sounds_from_space

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10. ExoMars 2016 Launch

ExoMars  2016 Launch

Soundtrack of ExoMars, ESA's new mission to the Red Planet, lifting off from on a Proton-M rocket from Baikonur, Kazakhstan at 09:31 GMT on 14 March 2016.

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11. ESA ESTEC Test Centre Sounds: Bepi Colombo MCS on QUAD shaker (Sine 16G)

ESA ESTEC Test Centre Sounds: Bepi Colombo MCS on QUAD shaker (Sine 16G)

Spacecraft and Satellites are expensive, and once in space they cannot be easily fixed. This is why they must be tested thoroughly before they are sent into space. During the various phases of its development a spacecraft or satellite and its component parts undergo extensive testing. The majority of ESA spacecraft are tested at the ESA ESTEC Test Centre. Here's a sound sample of the BepiColombo Mercury Composite Spacecraft (MCS) on the QUAD shaker in the Test Centre at ESA's European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. See also http://sci.esa.int/bepicolombo/50658-bepicolombo-mcs-on-the-quad-shaker/ The sample is completely unedited and in its original length. Credit: ESA - European Space Agency, ESTEC, CC BY-SA IGO 3.0 http://www.esa.int/Services/Creative_Commons_Attribution-ShareAlike_3.0_IGO_CC_BY-SA_3.0_IGO_Licence

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12. International Space Station warning alarm

International Space Station warning alarm

Ever wonder how the International Space Station alarms sound? This warning alert is sounded whenever an anomaly is detected that is not life-threatening but does require immediate action. These require an immediate response because an important component of the Space Station has a problem. These are also marked in red and the alarm is designed to attract attention. Based on the error code that is displayed, the astronauts and control centres can quickly reach for the appropriate procedure to follow as a first response to warnings. This sound was sent to us by the Columbus Control Centre near, München, Germany, the operations centre for ESA astronauts and the Columbus laboratory, part of the orbiting weightless research centre. Image credit: ESA/NASA Audio credit: ESA, CC BY-SA IGO 3.0 http://www.esa.int/Services/Creative_Commons_Attribution-ShareAlike_3.0_IGO_CC_BY-SA_3.0_IGO_Licence https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/

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13. Churyumov - Gerasimenko - Audio by Irina Vavilova

Churyumov - Gerasimenko - Audio by Irina Vavilova

How to pronounce the name of Rosetta's comet: Churyumov–Gerasimenko. After Klim Churyumov and Svetlana Gerasimenko, the two Ukrainian astronomers who discovered it in 1969. Courtesy of Irina Vavilova from the Main Astronomical Observatory of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine.

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14. The sound of Philae conducting science - 1

The sound of Philae conducting science - 1

Philae’s SESAME-CASSE instrument ‘listened’ to the lander’s MUPUS instrument hammer the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko last November. Note: Access full description of this audio file via: http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2015/11/12/the-sound-of-philae-conducting-science/ ** SESAME-CASSE is the Cometary Acoustic Sounding Surface Experiment located in the lander’s feet in the form of three accelerometers, each of which records acceleration in three directions (one vertical and two horizontal) ** MUPUS comprises the Multi-Purpose Sensors for Surface and Subsurface Science – including the MUPUS penetrator that was activated towards the end of Philae’s first science sequence on 14 November 2014 It was recognized early in the preparation of both experiments that the hammering mechanism of MUPUS, which drives a thermal probe into the comet’s surface, would serve as an acoustic source for sounding the subsurface with CASSE. The determination of the propagation velocity of sound would allow scientists to look at possible layering in the comet’s surface/subsurface materials, important for understanding its evolution. The CASSE instrument listened to the hammering of MUPUS for 2 hours and 15 minutes. Due to memory limitations, CASSE was not able to take continuous recordings, but only recorded a few seconds in one go. A total of 15 hammer strokes were recorded; this audio file contains two signals. The time between the two strokes fits to the charge time of the hammer mechanism expected at that time, thus this particular recording proves that CASSE was really recording hammer strokes. When recorded, the Philae lander and the comet were about 510 million kilometres from Earth. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/Philae/SESAME/DLR (CC BY-SA IGO 3.0)

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15. ESA ESTEC Test Centre Sounds: CHEOPS space telescope acoustic testing (Mic 8)

ESA ESTEC Test Centre Sounds: CHEOPS space telescope acoustic testing (Mic 8)

Spacecraft and Satellites are expensive, and once in space they cannot be easily fixed. This is why they must be tested thoroughly before they are sent into space. During the various phases of its development a spacecraft or satellite and its component parts undergo extensive testing. The majority of ESA spacecraft and satellites are tested at the ESA ESTEC Test Centre in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. This is the sound of ESA's CHEOPS - CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite - being tested in the Large European Acoustic Facility (LEAF). Anyone who has witnessed a rocket launch is struck by the amount of noise produced by it – even when standing several kilometres from the launch pad. Of course a satellite on top of its launcher is exposed to much higher levels of acoustic noise. Long before it gets to that stage its designers have to test that the satellite can withstand such a sustained sound – and this is done at the LEAF. Listen to how it sounds - and to some according explanations artist and technologist Peter Kirn gives: http://tedx.esa.int/talks/space-science-sound-system/ CHEOPS is the first mission dedicated to searching for exoplanetary transits by performing ultra-high precision photometry on bright stars already known to host planets. The mission's main science goals are to measure the bulk density of super-Earths and Neptunes orbiting bright stars and provide suitable targets for future in-depth characterisation studies of exoplanets in these mass and size ranges. Read more at http://sci.esa.int/cheops/ The sample is completely unedited and in its original length. Sound Credit: ESA - European Space Agency, ESTEC, CC BY-SA IGO 3.0 http://www.esa.int/Services/Creative_Commons_Attribution-ShareAlike_3.0_IGO_CC_BY-SA_3.0_IGO_Licence Image Credit: ESA - Christophe Carreau

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16. Rosetta: Our Sleeping Beauty

Rosetta: Our Sleeping Beauty

#WakeUpRosetta - Once upon a time a spacecraft named Rosetta was launched into the sky to uncover mysteries of our Solar System. A long journey lay ahead. Enter ESA's #WakeUpRosetta contest - add your video and vote for your favourite: http://www.facebook.com/rosettamission See the original teaser video via http://bit.ly/1kqZ3uU Audio credit: ESA/Design & Data GmbH/Loudbranding This file free for non-profit, education use.

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17. ESA ESTEC Test Centre Sounds: CHEOPS space telescope acoustic testing (Mic 1)

ESA ESTEC Test Centre Sounds: CHEOPS space telescope acoustic testing (Mic 1)

Spacecraft and Satellites are expensive, and once in space they cannot be easily fixed. This is why they must be tested thoroughly before they are sent into space. During the various phases of its development a spacecraft or satellite and its component parts undergo extensive testing. The majority of ESA spacecraft and satellites are tested at the ESA ESTEC Test Centre in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. This is the sound of ESA's CHEOPS - CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite - being tested in the Large European Acoustic Facility (LEAF). Anyone who has witnessed a rocket launch is struck by the amount of noise produced by it – even when standing several kilometres from the launch pad. Of course a satellite on top of its launcher is exposed to much higher levels of acoustic noise. Long before it gets to that stage its designers have to test that the satellite can withstand such a sustained sound – and this is done at the LEAF. Listen to how it sounds - and to some according explanations artist and technologist Peter Kirn gives: http://tedx.esa.int/talks/space-science-sound-system/ CHEOPS is the first mission dedicated to searching for exoplanetary transits by performing ultra-high precision photometry on bright stars already known to host planets. The mission's main science goals are to measure the bulk density of super-Earths and Neptunes orbiting bright stars and provide suitable targets for future in-depth characterisation studies of exoplanets in these mass and size ranges. Read more at http://sci.esa.int/cheops/ The sample is completely unedited and in its original length. Sound Credit: ESA - European Space Agency, ESTEC, CC BY-SA IGO 3.0 http://www.esa.int/Services/Creative_Commons_Attribution-ShareAlike_3.0_IGO_CC_BY-SA_3.0_IGO_Licence Image Credit: ESA - Christophe Carreau

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