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1. The poetry society

The poetry society

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2. Michael Hofmann reads 'Baselitz and his Generation'

Michael Hofmann reads 'Baselitz and his Generation'

This poem was specially commissioned by the British Museum, London, in partnership with the Poetry Society. It was inspired by the exhibition, 'Germany Divided: Baselitz & his generation', at the British Museum, London, 2014. http://www.britishmuseum.org/whats_on/exhibitions/germany_divided.aspx

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3. Kathryn Maris reads 'The House with Only an Attic and a Basement'

Kathryn Maris reads 'The House with Only an Attic and a Basement'

This poem was specially commissioned by the British Museum, London, in partnership with the Poetry Society. It was inspired by the exhibition, 'Germany Divided: Baselitz & his generation', at the British Museum, London, 2014. http://www.britishmuseum.org/whats_on/exhibitions/germany_divided.aspx

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4. Sam Riviere reads his poem, 'untitled'

Sam Riviere reads his poem, 'untitled'

This poem was specially commissioned by the British Museum, London, in partnership with the Poetry Society. It was inspired by the exhibition, 'Germany Divided: Baselitz & his generation', at the British Museum, London, 2014. http://www.britishmuseum.org/whats_on/exhibitions/germany_divided.aspx

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5. Kei Miller reads 'Place Name: Oracabessa'

Kei Miller reads 'Place Name: Oracabessa'

Working in collaboration with Royal Collection Trust, The Poetry Society commissioned Forward Prize winning poet Kei Miller to create a new poem. Place Name – Oracabessa, skilfully unites the themes of Gold and Journeys and follows the form of Miller's award winning collection 'The Cartographer tries to map his way to Zion'. The poem was premiered at an evening event in The Queen's Gallery on Thursday, 12 February 2015 to a full audience.

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6. Paul Muldoon talks to Maurice Riordan

Paul Muldoon talks to Maurice Riordan

"Many writers write not because they're fluent or because they have any kind of ability in a language but for the exact opposite reason." Paul Muldoon talks to Maurice Riordan, Editor of The Poetry Review, about Heaney, Beckett and Joyce, and reads 'A Dent' from his new collection, One Thousand Things Worth Knowing (Faber).

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7. The 2019 Poem-A-Thon: Part 2

The 2019 Poem-A-Thon: Part 2

On Saturday 18 May 2019, The Poetry Society hosted an all day poetry fundraising extravaganza, including a 10 hour sponsored poetry reading from a line-up of 60 poets. This is part 2, comprising hours 2-4 of the event. You can listen to part 1 on Soundcloud or your podcasting app of choice. See below for the timings of featured poets' sets, and remember that you can still donate to the fundraising campaign via bit.ly/poemdonate. PART 2: FEATURED POETS 0:00 : Julie Irigaray 10:30 : Eithne Cullen 22:00 : Bridget Minamore 33:00 : Denise Saul 43:45 : Sam Grudgings 52:30 : Lisa Kelly 01:00:00 : Kirsten Irving 01:13:00 : Oliver Fox 01:23:30: Helen Bowell 01:32:30 : Ramona Herdman 01:42:00 : Astra Papachristodoulou The final 3 parts will be made available as soon as we're done editing: stay tuned!

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8. Emily Berry talks to Ishion Hutchinson

Emily Berry talks to Ishion Hutchinson

“Poetry is an inner armour available to anyone,” says the celebrated Jamaican poet Ishion Hutchinson in this latest in The Poetry Review podcast series. In conversation with Review Editor Emily Berry, Hutchinson talks about his influences (citing Donne, Eliot and George Seferis) and his poetics; about homesickness, travel and "returning responsibly". Hutchinson also reads his poems, ‘West Ride Out’ and ‘Travel Axe’, both first published in The Poetry Review. To connect with more poetry, visit poetrysociety.org.uk

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9. Fiona Benson talks to Emily Berry

Fiona Benson talks to Emily Berry

“I think shame is very unhelpful, that taboos can be very unhelpful – maybe we should try and be as brave as our poems.” Fiona Benson, author of the prize-winning collection Bright Travellers, talks to Review Editor Emily Berry, about her new collection Vertigo & Ghost, forthcoming from Cape in 2019. They consider questions of shame, permission and catharsis, the challenges of working with difficult material and ‘breaking through’ – the ways in which writing works to bring the inside outside, and the influence of writers such as Sylvia Plath, Sharon Olds and Lucille Clifton. Benson also reflects on the sublime and its possibilities in contemporary poetry, with reference to Whitman, Rilke and Ginsberg. She reads her astonishing poems ‘Fly’ and ‘[Zeus] Anatomical Dolls’, both first published in The Poetry Review. To connect with more poetry, visit poetrysociety.org.uk

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10. Popescu: Ciaran Carson reads Arthur Rimbaud

Popescu: Ciaran Carson reads Arthur Rimbaud

Ciaran Carson reads from In the Light Of, after Illuminations by Arthur Rimbaud (The Gallery Press), which he translated from French. The book was shortlisted for the 2013 Popescu Prize for Poetry in Translation, organised by the Poetry Society.

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11. Simon Armitage talks to Maurice Riordan

Simon Armitage talks to Maurice Riordan

Simon Armitage talks about his writing home – his teenager's bedroom in Marsden, West Yorkshire, of taking poetry out into the world on long walks, on the radio and in the theatre – the "go anywhere artform" in Les Murray's phrase. He also talks about compiling his new Selected and reads his new poems 'Camera Obscura' and 'Paper Aeroplane'.

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12. Popescu: Peter Manson reads Stéphane Mallarmé

Popescu: Peter Manson reads Stéphane Mallarmé

Peter Manson reads from The Poems in Verse by Stéphane Mallarmé (Miami University Press), which he translated from French. The book was shortlisted for the 2013 Popescu Prize for Poetry in Translation, organised by the Poetry Society.

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13. Popescu: Lorna Shaughnessy reads Manuel Rivas

Popescu: Lorna Shaughnessy reads Manuel Rivas

Lorna Shaughnessy reads from The Disappearance of Snow by Manuel Rivas (Shearsman), which she translated from Galician. The book was shortlisted for the 2013 Popescu Prize for Poetry in Translation, organised by the Poetry Society.

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14. Gillian Allnutt talks to Emily Berry

Gillian Allnutt talks to Emily Berry

‘You listen for the poem to say itself’ Emily Berry talks to Gillian Allnutt about meditation, fragmentation and the ‘hinterland’ of the poem. To connect with more poetry, visit poetrysociety.org.uk

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15. Paul Nemser on the National Poetry Competition

Paul Nemser on the National Poetry Competition

US poet Paul Nemser was delighted to have been commended in the The Poetry Society's National Poetry Competition – "an opportunity to have one's work looked at [anonymously] by very, very good poets". He spoke to Mike Sims about being taught by Robert Lowell, Elizabeth Bishop and Stanley Kunitz, the benefits of translating poetry and why competitions matter.

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16. David Constantine reads ‘When I Left You, Afterwards…’ by Bertolt Brecht

David Constantine reads ‘When I Left You, Afterwards…’ by Bertolt Brecht

David Constantine reads ‘When I Left You, Afterwards…’ from his Popescu Prize shortlisted translation of Bertolt Brecht’s collection Love Poems, published by Liveright. The Popescu European Poetry Translation Prize has been awarded biennially by The Poetry Society for a volume of poetry translated from a European language into English. The judges this year are Olivia McCannon and Clare Pollard. The prize is supported in 2015 by the British Council. For more information on the 2015 Popescu Prize and selected poems please visit our website: http://poetrysociety.org.uk/competitions/popescu-prize/2015-2/

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17. Mark Doty interviewed by Richard Scott

Mark Doty interviewed by Richard Scott

In an absorbing exchange, acclaimed US poet Mark Doty talks to Richard Scott about some of his most famous poems, the gay experience in literature, the inspiration of Cavafy and Rilke, Doty's new Whitman project, and grieving, courage and desire.

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18. Jen Hadfield on Maria Merian, death and her poem 'The Lantern Fly'

Jen Hadfield on Maria Merian, death and her poem 'The Lantern Fly'

Jen Hadfield was commissioned by The Poetry Society and the Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace, to write her poem, ‘The Lantern Fly’, inspired by an exhibition of paintings by the German artist and entomologist Maria Merian. She talks to Judith Palmer about the “jewelline, sparkling” natural world of her home on Shetland, and how Merian’s pioneering spirit and paintings inspired a poem in which death is represented by the lantern fly, “unable to find the person that it’s meant to be ministering to”. She also reads her poem 'Lichen'. To connect with more poetry, visit poetrysociety.org.uk

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19. Mark Doty 'A Green Crab's Shell'

Mark Doty 'A Green Crab's Shell'

'A Green Crab's Shell' by Mark Doty. Published in Atlantis (Cape Poetry, 1996). Recorded in the Poetry Society studio, 22 Betterton Street, London WC2H 9BX, on Tuesday 8 October.

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